4 foot high tank

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by intenseimagery@gmail.com, Oct 8, 2006.

  1. Hi there

    I'm looking to get back into a marine tank. It's been a while since I
    have had one. the last was a bio ball setup which i believe has gone
    out of fashion to be replaced by live rocks etc. anyway my question
    is.. I'm looking at this tank
    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Unique-Custo...3QQihZ005QQcategoryZ20755QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    and just wondering if higher rather than wider tanks are still harder
    to maintain with the new techniques of fish and invertebrates keeping.

    Cheers thanks for taking the tinme to repspond
     
    intenseimagery@gmail.com, Oct 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. intenseimagery@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi there
    >
    > I'm looking to get back into a marine tank. It's been a while since I
    > have had one. the last was a bio ball setup which i believe has gone
    > out of fashion to be replaced by live rocks etc. anyway my question
    > is.. I'm looking at this tank
    > http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Unique-Custo...3QQihZ005QQcategoryZ20755QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
    >
    > and just wondering if higher rather than wider tanks are still harder
    > to maintain with the new techniques of fish and invertebrates keeping.



    The surface area is still the main limiting factor. That's not your main problem
    here, however. This tank has aluminum edging. Metal is a no-no in marine tanks.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 8, 2006
    #2
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  3. intenseimagery@gmail.com

    Pszemol Guest

    "George Patterson" <grpphoto@verizon.net> wrote in message news:vT8Wg.730$2l5.405@trnddc07...
    > intenseimagery@gmail.com wrote:
    >> I'm looking to get back into a marine tank. It's been a while since I
    >> have had one. the last was a bio ball setup which i believe has gone
    >> out of fashion to be replaced by live rocks etc. anyway my question
    >> is.. I'm looking at this tank
    >> http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Unique-Custo...3QQihZ005QQcategoryZ20755QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
    >>
    >> and just wondering if higher rather than wider tanks are still harder
    >> to maintain with the new techniques of fish and invertebrates keeping.

    >
    >
    > The surface area is still the main limiting factor. That's not your main problem here, however. This tank has aluminum edging.
    > Metal is a no-no in marine tanks.


    You are correct, but I would say more important problem will be the hight.
    Unless you are a chimpanzee with 4-feet long arms - how are you going
    to mantain this tank ? Have you imagined the ways you will do aquascaping?
    How do you set up the rock work ? Not everything can be done with tongs!

    2nd issue - fish collection. This tank can be ok for seahorses, but almost
    any other fish needs an ample room for swiming left to righ, not up/down.

    3rd issue - reef /lighting. All corals which need light will have to be on the
    top, 2x2' surface, so it will be limited room for reef design. Also, you
    will have to have very strong bulb and good light focusing reflector to
    reach tank that deep if you place any ligth liking animal near the bottom.
    Other than that - the tank will be dark.

    Think of the reasons the person is selling this tank and you will know why
    you do not want to have it as well :)))
     
    Pszemol, Oct 8, 2006
    #3
  4. Pszemol wrote:

    > You are correct, but I would say more important problem will be the hight.
    > Unless you are a chimpanzee with 4-feet long arms - how are you going
    > to mantain this tank ? Have you imagined the ways you will do aquascaping?
    > How do you set up the rock work ? Not everything can be done with tongs!


    Yep, that's a problem.

    > 2nd issue - fish collection. This tank can be ok for seahorses, but almost
    > any other fish needs an ample room for swiming left to righ, not up/down.


    Maybe. I had a friend who had a similar tank with a large moray eel in it. He
    built an artificial coral head in the center, and it was very impressive. I can
    imagine the same sort of thing set up with several small fish; in fact, I saw
    something like what I envision at the Boston aquarium. The fish tend to just
    swim around the center decoration.

    > 3rd issue - reef /lighting. All corals which need light will have to be
    > on the
    > top, 2x2' surface, so it will be limited room for reef design. Also, you
    > will have to have very strong bulb and good light focusing reflector to
    > reach tank that deep if you place any ligth liking animal near the bottom.
    > Other than that - the tank will be dark.


    I'm not so sure about that. My vet has a huge reef tank in the lobby. This thing
    is at least 12' high and 10' across. Since it sits on a stand about 4' high,
    we're talking about a water column about 8' high; maybe several feet more. It's
    circular, with a huge column of live rock in the center. I'm sure there's some
    sort of framework to support this, but it's cleverly hidden; probably some sort
    of rack of plastic shelves.

    Way up at the top is a set of 6 lights, arranged in a radial fashion. They
    resemble the Outer Orbit brand, but may not be. This tank supports some
    impressive soft corals at eye level. That makes them about 7' below the lights.

    Of course, you have the standard fluorescent lighting common in waiting rooms to
    help out, but I think the tank lights are doing the majority of the work.

    As an interesting side note, this tank apparently has some sort of refugium at
    the top of the live rock column. If you back off into the main lobby, you can
    see the tops of some mangroves sticking up above the rock.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 9, 2006
    #4
  5. George Patterson wrote:
    > Pszemol wrote:
    >
    > > You are correct, but I would say more important problem will be the hight.
    > > Unless you are a chimpanzee with 4-feet long arms - how are you going
    > > to mantain this tank ? Have you imagined the ways you will do aquascaping?
    > > How do you set up the rock work ? Not everything can be done with tongs!

    >
    > Yep, that's a problem.
    >
    > > 2nd issue - fish collection. This tank can be ok for seahorses, but almost
    > > any other fish needs an ample room for swiming left to righ, not up/down.

    >
    > Maybe. I had a friend who had a similar tank with a large moray eel in it. He
    > built an artificial coral head in the center, and it was very impressive. I can
    > imagine the same sort of thing set up with several small fish; in fact, I saw
    > something like what I envision at the Boston aquarium. The fish tend to just
    > swim around the center decoration.
    >
    > > 3rd issue - reef /lighting. All corals which need light will have to be
    > > on the
    > > top, 2x2' surface, so it will be limited room for reef design. Also, you
    > > will have to have very strong bulb and good light focusing reflector to
    > > reach tank that deep if you place any ligth liking animal near the bottom.
    > > Other than that - the tank will be dark.

    >
    > I'm not so sure about that. My vet has a huge reef tank in the lobby. This thing
    > is at least 12' high and 10' across. Since it sits on a stand about 4' high,
    > we're talking about a water column about 8' high; maybe several feet more. It's
    > circular, with a huge column of live rock in the center. I'm sure there's some
    > sort of framework to support this, but it's cleverly hidden; probably some sort
    > of rack of plastic shelves.
    >
    > Way up at the top is a set of 6 lights, arranged in a radial fashion. They
    > resemble the Outer Orbit brand, but may not be. This tank supports some
    > impressive soft corals at eye level. That makes them about 7' below the lights.
    >
    > Of course, you have the standard fluorescent lighting common in waiting rooms to
    > help out, but I think the tank lights are doing the majority of the work.
    >
    > As an interesting side note, this tank apparently has some sort of refugium at
    > the top of the live rock column. If you back off into the main lobby, you can
    > see the tops of some mangroves sticking up above the rock.
    >
    > George Patterson
    > All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.


    Thanks for all your replys,

    I believe the aluminuim in on the outside to hide the corners only, so
    i dont think that will be a problem. I'm still seeing this as a
    challege as it would look very cool. I didn't think about getting into
    the tank tho. so thanks for brinnging that to my attention. I am 6.4 so
    i have a good reach tho(with tongs... lol good idea). still weighing up
    the pros and cons. ok cons only. I think the biggest problem will be
    water movement. any ideas?
     
    intenseimagery@gmail.com, Oct 10, 2006
    #5
  6. intenseimagery@gmail.com wrote:

    > I believe the aluminuim in on the outside to hide the corners only, so
    > i dont think that will be a problem. I'm still seeing this as a
    > challege as it would look very cool. I didn't think about getting into
    > the tank tho. so thanks for brinnging that to my attention. I am 6.4 so
    > i have a good reach tho(with tongs... lol good idea). still weighing up
    > the pros and cons. ok cons only. I think the biggest problem will be
    > water movement. any ideas?


    The large tank I mentioned has plastic grates visible within the central stack
    of live rock. I would guess that some are intakes and others outlets for
    circulation pumps.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 10, 2006
    #6
  7. "George Patterson" <grpphoto@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:OjCWg.1651$Gp4.545@trnddc08...
    > intenseimagery@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    >> I believe the aluminuim in on the outside to hide the corners only, so
    >> i dont think that will be a problem. I'm still seeing this as a
    >> challege as it would look very cool. I didn't think about getting into
    >> the tank tho. so thanks for brinnging that to my attention. I am 6.4 so
    >> i have a good reach tho(with tongs... lol good idea). still weighing up
    >> the pros and cons. ok cons only. I think the biggest problem will be
    >> water movement. any ideas?

    >
    > The large tank I mentioned has plastic grates visible within the central
    > stack of live rock. I would guess that some are intakes and others outlets
    > for circulation pumps.
    >
    > George Patterson
    > All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are
    > permanent.


    I fit branching plumbing on my powerheads to achieve less dead spots.
    I try leave some chilled spots for fish to rest/sleep tho.
    A tank non stop blasted is a tank fed 10 times a day to fend off death.
    Something I am getting into more is drilling 2 holes thru the base and
    rigging a cannister filter under the tank.
    Simple, hidden and yea I likes....... is more suitable to small oddball
    tanks tho
    For a large deep one thats gonna be mostly fish only..... shock horror I'd
    reccomend maybe 4 of those round black air powered sponge filters.
    the bubble updraft will circulate the deep tank quite well. 4 means you can
    stagger cleaning.
    Lids are needed tho to fend off splash and pop from da bubbles!
    chuck in a nice powerhead for more surface agitation and current and it
    would be a suitable el' cheapo solution.
    then ya just gotta cycle the bugger
    :p
     
    swarvegorilla, Oct 10, 2006
    #7
  8. intenseimagery@gmail.com

    Pszemol Guest

    "swarvegorilla" <fatcatfish@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message news:452b0643$0$3249$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    > I fit branching plumbing on my powerheads to achieve less dead spots.
    > I try leave some chilled spots for fish to rest/sleep tho.
    > A tank non stop blasted is a tank fed 10 times a day to fend off death.


    Are you talking about reef tank or fish-only tank ?

    > For a large deep one thats gonna be mostly fish only..... shock horror I'd
    > reccomend maybe 4 of those round black air powered sponge filters.
    > the bubble updraft will circulate the deep tank quite well. 4 means you can
    > stagger cleaning.


    Air powered sponges in a reef/marine setup ? :cool:
     
    Pszemol, Oct 10, 2006
    #8
  9. "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:egehma.ls.1@poczta.onet.pl...
    > "swarvegorilla" <fatcatfish@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
    > news:452b0643$0$3249$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    >> I fit branching plumbing on my powerheads to achieve less dead spots.
    >> I try leave some chilled spots for fish to rest/sleep tho.
    >> A tank non stop blasted is a tank fed 10 times a day to fend off death.

    >
    > Are you talking about reef tank or fish-only tank ?


    both, well i was.
    the topic starter was kinda vague

    >
    >> For a large deep one thats gonna be mostly fish only..... shock horror
    >> I'd reccomend maybe 4 of those round black air powered sponge filters.
    >> the bubble updraft will circulate the deep tank quite well. 4 means you
    >> can stagger cleaning.

    >
    > Air powered sponges in a reef/marine setup ? :cool:


    a column of liverock and..... don't sound like much of a reef to me.
    And yes I currently run 5 tanks on nothing but them and powerheads. Sure
    maybe only 5 out of 20 that I play with weekly but they work for deep tanks.
    I am well aware of the need for circulation and it's importance for reef
    critters.

    but ya they work well in a marine tank.
    infact I can't really think of a freshwater based filter that wouldn't work
    in saltwater?
    minus rusting bits and stuff.

    anyway tis cheap and easy
    and as a plus the bubbles look good.
    heck if ya can chill the air it chills the tank
    rokin

    doesn't have to be a final filtration solution but they do cycle well
    and are easy the phase out.
    plus they are handy to rig to battery powered aerators in blackouts
    :)

    cheap easy and foolproof is popular with me hey
     
    swarvegorilla, Oct 10, 2006
    #9
  10. intenseimagery@gmail.com

    Pszemol Guest

    "swarvegorilla" <fatcatfish@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message news:452bab46$0$5106$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    > And yes I currently run 5 tanks on nothing but them and powerheads.


    Do you have some pictures of your 5 tanks with nothing than sponge filters?
    I would love to see them...
     
    Pszemol, Oct 10, 2006
    #10
  11. intenseimagery@gmail.com

    Wayne Sallee Guest

    swarvegorilla wrote on 10/10/2006 10:17 AM:

    >
    > cheap easy and foolproof is popular with me hey
    >


    Nope, not foolproof in a salt water aquarium.

    Air lines will clog with minerals, and salt creep will
    abound on top of the tank.

    Wayne Sallee
    Wayne's Pets
    Wayne@WaynesPets.com
     
    Wayne Sallee, Oct 10, 2006
    #11
  12. Wayne Sallee wrote:
    > swarvegorilla wrote on 10/10/2006 10:17 AM:
    >
    > >
    > > cheap easy and foolproof is popular with me hey
    > >

    >
    > Nope, not foolproof in a salt water aquarium.
    >
    > Air lines will clog with minerals, and salt creep will
    > abound on top of the tank.
    >
    > Wayne Sallee
    > Wayne's Pets
    > Wayne@WaynesPets.com


    Thanks for all you replys guys, on another note I just saw the tank in
    question is 12mm think glass. Does this sound adequate to you? It seems
    a bit light for me. I found the equation at
    http://saltaquarium.about.com/cs/aquariumdiy/a/aa052903DIYcust.htm but
    cant make any sense of it.
     
    intenseimagery@gmail.com, Oct 10, 2006
    #12
  13. intenseimagery@gmail.com wrote:

    > Thanks for all you replys guys, on another note I just saw the tank in
    > question is 12mm thick glass. Does this sound adequate to you? It seems
    > a bit light for me. I found the equation at
    > http://saltaquarium.about.com/cs/aquariumdiy/a/aa052903DIYcust.htm but
    > cant make any sense of it.


    The equation produces a minimum thickness of 17.4825 mm. I find it interesting,
    since the equation says that the glass for my commercially manufactured 125
    gallon should be 11.31mm thick, and it's actually only 9mm.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 11, 2006
    #13
  14. intenseimagery@gmail.com

    Pszemol Guest

    "George Patterson" <grpphoto@verizon.net> wrote in message news:3JWWg.1110$P92.616@trndny02...
    > The equation produces a minimum thickness of 17.4825 mm. I find it interesting,
    > since the equation says that the glass for my commercially manufactured 125
    > gallon should be 11.31mm thick, and it's actually only 9mm.


    Is it tempered or just float ?
     
    Pszemol, Oct 11, 2006
    #14
  15. Pszemol wrote:
    > "George Patterson" <grpphoto@verizon.net> wrote in message news:3JWWg.1110$P92.616@trndny02...
    > > The equation produces a minimum thickness of 17.4825 mm. I find it interesting,
    > > since the equation says that the glass for my commercially manufactured 125
    > > gallon should be 11.31mm thick, and it's actually only 9mm.

    >
    > Is it tempered or just float ?


    Just good ol regular glass i believe.

    I believe the author of the calculator has a large safety margin to
    withstand hard knocks.

    George, your tank is only 2mm difference my tanks is over 5mm. dont
    think I want to risk putting 450 litres on my lounge room floor. LOL.
    Will contact seller, hopfully it's a mistake and he ment to right 15mm
    think glass. that I can handle.
     
    intenseimagery@gmail.com, Oct 11, 2006
    #15
  16. "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:egfs5u.du0.0@poczta.onet.pl...
    > "swarvegorilla" <fatcatfish@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
    > news:452bab46$0$5106$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    >> And yes I currently run 5 tanks on nothing but them and powerheads.

    >
    > Do you have some pictures of your 5 tanks with nothing than sponge
    > filters?
    > I would love to see them...


    Okay but they are fish only yea
    gimme a bit here
    these are busy days
    but I could walk over to a mates and show you pics of a rack of nemo raising
    tanks running ugf
     
    swarvegorilla, Oct 11, 2006
    #16
  17. "Wayne Sallee" <Wayne@WayneSallee.com> wrote in message
    news:98PWg.7497$Y24.1346@newsread4.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    > swarvegorilla wrote on 10/10/2006 10:17 AM:
    >
    >>
    >> cheap easy and foolproof is popular with me hey
    >>

    >
    > Nope, not foolproof in a salt water aquarium.
    >
    > Air lines will clog with minerals, and salt creep will abound on top of
    > the tank.
    >


    In time yes but nothing a bit of maintence won't fix.
    there is no problem that can't be worked around and no filter that doesn't
    have any drawbacks.
    hang on back increase evap, cannisters are nitrate factorys, trickles are
    nitrate factorys..... sometimes ya just use whats at hand and cheap and
    don't be a pussy about it
    but I digress, I have a lot to learn about reef .
    I always do like to duplicate great success I have had in tanks with copys
    using much cheaper and more basic technology
    people have a tendancy to aim for the best goochie new technology when with
    good husbandry the requirments can be met with a lot less.
    :)
    I ain't havin a dig mate, just had to set up a new rack , most the fish in
    the tanks are cycling mollies
    but the filters are sponges eh
    dam that salt creep
     
    swarvegorilla, Oct 11, 2006
    #17
  18. Pszemol wrote:

    > Is it tempered or just float ?


    Dunno. I bought it about 15 years ago and don't remember the brand. I was
    replacing a 20 year old 100 gallon tank made of 1/2" float glass and was mainly
    delighted with the fact that this larger tank was actually lighter than my old one.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 11, 2006
    #18
  19. intenseimagery@gmail.com

    Pszemol Guest

    "swarvegorilla" <fatcatfish@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message news:452cde9f$0$11971$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au...
    > Okay but they are fish only yea
    > gimme a bit here
    > these are busy days
    > but I could walk over to a mates and show you pics of a rack of nemo raising
    > tanks running ugf


    No need to show me breeding tanks I have my own to look at.
    I want to see beautiful show tanks, the ones you have with sponge filters.
     
    Pszemol, Oct 11, 2006
    #19
  20. intenseimagery@gmail.com

    Wayne Sallee Guest

    swarvegorilla wrote on 10/11/2006 8:27 AM:
    > In time yes but nothing a bit of maintence won't fix.
    > there is no problem that can't be worked around and no filter that doesn't
    > have any drawbacks.


    But some filters have more drawbacks than others.
    And who wants to make reef keeping a chore with
    unnecessary maintenance and fixing.

    Some of us have been in the hobby a long time, and know
    what works well, and what doesn't.

    Wayne Sallee
    Wayne's Pets
    Wayne@WaynesPets.com
     
    Wayne Sallee, Oct 12, 2006
    #20
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