AI Sol blue info required what % = what Kelvin temp

Discussion in 'Lighting, Filtration & Other Equipment' started by rixster64, Jan 4, 2013.

  1. rixster64

    rixster64

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    hi all,
    don't suppose anyone has worked out what percentage = what kelvin range. looking to find a happy medium with a colour temp of about 12-14k. i know the white gives 6500k and 100% on w,b,rb give around 20000k - 23000K.
    i know people say whatever pleases the eye, and i know this might sound daft, but i want to please my corals, their the ones who have to look at it all day!!![​IMG]
    at the moment, i run mine at W30% B35% RB35%
     
    rixster64, Jan 4, 2013
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  2. rixster64

    Northstar24 The Tang Herder

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    I think you're going to have to adjust those percentages up. I dont know of any conversion to figure out a specific Kelvin value for different percentages of each of the LED channels. The Sol Blue is obviously going to be on the blue side of the specrum, honestly set it to whatever look you prefer

    I currently run mine at 65 / 100 / 100. I also have a manual mode set for when I want to show people what corals look like under actinic lighting. I think that mode is set to like 20/70/90 if I remember correctly, but I hardly ever run it in manual mode
     
    Northstar24, Jan 4, 2013
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  3. rixster64

    FishyReef Broke Reefer!

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    I ran mine at about your percentages for quite some time, and have slowly been adjusting them up during the mid-day timers. I'm currently at 50/55/55 at the height of my light cycle and plan to continue bringing them up higher and for longer. As you adjust them up, make sure to do so slowly - like 5% each at a time for a couple of weeks. I eventually plan to get up to the levels Northstar is running his at, but its going to take quite a bit of time. The prettiest tank I've ever seen is running AI Sols at 100/100/100 for 6 hours a day with ramping up and down for a few hours on each end. But it took this guy over a year to reach those numbers. If you increase too quickly it will shock your corals.
     
    FishyReef, Jan 4, 2013
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  4. rixster64

    rixster64

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    hi, thanks for input again, i asked a similar Q before about settings, it was more for info only for newbies and myself with leds, it would just nice if someone asked and i could just say something like 14k = W65 B75 RB80, it just gives people something to head for after starting low in first place.i think on radions, ecotech do this on their pc programme for them, you just tick a box next to 12k,14k etc and it adjust them to that colour, regardless of intensity. dont quote me tho, im sure someone will correct me if im wrong.
    cheers
     
    rixster64, Jan 4, 2013
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  5. rixster64

    Northstar24 The Tang Herder

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    Honestly, I don't really think it matters, most of the time a person gets attached to a particular Kelvin rating its because they like the look that it gives the tank. Since all you're really after is the color that makes your tank look the most pleasing to you, does it really matter if you get there by choosing a specific Kelvin value or a specific intensity for individual LED lights?

    Sure, whiter Kelvins will grow corals faster (and give them muted, washed out looks) and a Kelvin more in the blue range will make corals look fantastic (but grow slower). I know of no 'magical' Kelvin rating that leads to the 'fastest' coral growth or the 'best' coral coloration, nor have I ever met anyone that chooses a specific Kelvin for those reasons
     
    Northstar24, Jan 4, 2013
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