Anyone with experience doing floors?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Forum' started by wontonflip, Jun 17, 2014.

  1. wontonflip

    wontonflip I failed Kobayashi Maru

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    So we've ripped out our carpets and replacing it with lamiante. we are doing it ourselves. There are some areas where the floor dips, even after we've sanded it down and tightened the screws. I know one option is to use leveling compound. Some spots that dip are at the floor joists, so I assume we have to seal them to make sure they don't seep through the floors. Another option obviously is to change out the floors. I'd like to use that as an absolute last resort. The floors look fine. Not moldy or rotten at all. Just settled I guess.

    My question is we saw some videos where people used this super thin and flexible piece of plywood to fill in the dips. Wouldn't cardboard work, too? If we filled in the spots with cardboard, it would act like a shim to keep those parts from dipping. I figure if we put it under the moisture barrier, it should be ok, right?
     
    wontonflip, Jun 17, 2014
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  2. wontonflip

    Northstar24 The Tang Herder

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    Cardboard doesn't really handle moisture at all. If I had to choose between plywood and cardboard, I would definitely go with the plywood - there is at least some moisture resistance there
     
    Northstar24, Jun 17, 2014
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  3. wontonflip

    motorcyclereefer I am Graffiti Petey

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    Could always just use floor leveler. But yes I would stay away from cardboard.
     
    motorcyclereefer, Jun 17, 2014
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  4. wontonflip

    wontonflip I failed Kobayashi Maru

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    We are going to use super thin plywood. We got some that are 1/8 thick. We decided at least we can sand that down as much as we need. I'm so excited about the floor we picked out. We didn't go super expensive, but not super cheap either. We got one rated AC4 (AC3 and up is recommended for homes with kids and pets). We are doing the main and top floor. We will keep the basement with the carpet.

    We just redid our small bathroom on the main floor. We used these vinyl planks that float. They're water proof and looks like real wood. We tried to get ones that looked as close to our laminate as possible. I'm quite impressed with all the options they have now besides hard wood. My mom has Pergo in her condo and it looks awesome. Of course those with real hard wood would scoff at laminate, but from the ones I've seen, if done correctly, they can look really really good.
     
    wontonflip, Jun 18, 2014
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  5. wontonflip

    salt_for_brains Alabama Reefer VIP Member

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    I have real hard wood and not scoffing at your decision for laminate:D I have been looking at researching the rubber flooring that looks like hard wood myself;)

    I agree definitely stay away from the cardboard.
     
    salt_for_brains, Jun 18, 2014
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  6. wontonflip

    Aquarian

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    Go to Home Depot or lowes and ask for "shim shingles" or "under course shingles" they taper from 1/16" to 1/4" you can score and cut them with a knife to the thickness you like, butt them up against the edge of the plywood th to transition from your build up back to the sub flooring. You can also get "floor patch" which is mixed on the floor with water ( small amounts) mix it to a runny peanut butter consistency and you can transition with that as well. Sometimes if it's not a big area you can double up the foam underlayment. Just don't be worried about getting it perfect, you won't just try to get it close so your floor doesn't bounce as you walk on it. You can pm me or email me if you have any questions or surprises.
     
    Aquarian, Jun 18, 2014
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  7. wontonflip

    wontonflip I failed Kobayashi Maru

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    Yeah we're not trying to make it perfect. We just want to make sure that we don't get too much of a bounce.

    The vinyl planks we used (Shaw brand from Lowes) are NICE. They look great in my vanity room! Easy to install. Plus technically, if I get flooded, I could remove the floors, let the subfloors dry, and put them back in.

    Here's a pic of our vanity room that we finished redoing last month. We have to hang up the new mirror and tile splashguard behind the sink, but as you can see, the floors could pass for wood. You'd have to bend down and really inspect it to notice it's not real.

    [​IMG]
     
    wontonflip, Jun 18, 2014
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  8. wontonflip

    Aquarian

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    We use shaw or a like brand vinyl strip glue down flooring in all our kitchens and entryways sometimes everywhere but the bedrooms. They are very durable, and unless you gouge across the strip they look great.
     
    Aquarian, Jun 18, 2014
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  9. wontonflip

    motorcyclereefer I am Graffiti Petey

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    Wow a bathroom shot that isnt a shelfie taken through a mirror!
     
    motorcyclereefer, Jun 18, 2014
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  10. wontonflip

    wontonflip I failed Kobayashi Maru

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    At least it's not a selfie on the toilet :poop:
     
    wontonflip, Jun 18, 2014
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  11. wontonflip

    d2mini VIP Member

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    Dammit, i wish i saw this before you bought the flooring! :(

    My experience with Shaw laminate in my old house with ANY moisture that gets left on the cracks (Piece of ice from the fridge, dog slobber, etc.) was bubbles that would form along the seams like the uppermost layer of material was lifting from the rest. It was the snap together kind. On the contrary, we had the old Pergo Select glued together kind in our master bed and bath which got wet all the time with no issues after 8-10 years.
     
    d2mini, Jun 18, 2014
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  12. wontonflip

    monique

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    when i did my floor i used floor cement. i mixed it fairly soft then leveled the spots that needed fixing. BUT you have to replywood the floor after leveling. i used 1/4 inch mahogany or whatever it is they make as a substitute now. and screw it down good so your floor doesn't creak then your new floor. whatever you use to level the floor you still have to have a flat surface on top or any little ridge or lump will gradually come through. the better the subfloor the better the finished result. i layed coushion floor on mine. its been down 7 yrs. no issuses. if you use a leveling compound without putting a subfloor on top it gradually crumbles and makes a depression again.
     
    monique, Jun 19, 2014
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  13. wontonflip

    wontonflip I failed Kobayashi Maru

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    We only used the Shaw brand for their vinyl planks for the bathroom. It's water proof. We immersed a small piece in water for like an hour and it came out perfect :) The bottom is made from rubber, the top is vinyl. They are click-and-lock and floats. My neighbor used Shaw laminate and they had problems with it, too. Most of it was poor installation. I think the people they hired to do their floors didn't make sure their floors were completely flat. You can see it bucking up in a lot of places. Plus they did a piss poor job of spacing the edges accordingly. There are some places where you can see the gap past the quarter rounds.

    For the house, we picked out Allen & Roth. It is 10mm with a 2mm padding. It's got an AC4 rating. It's really nice, actually :) We bought a few small samples, locked them together, and poured water on it. We left the water on it for a couple of days, and no damage whatsoever. Also we didn't want anything that was glued because we want the option to replace planks if they get damaged....and with 2 dogs, 3 cats, and 3 kids, there will be damage LOL I would have preferred Pergo (which is what my mom has), but it was a whole dollar/sq ft more. We're trying to keep the cost low without going super cheap. The 10mm thickness makes a huge difference in how the floor feels and looks.

    We did study that option (as big diy'ers, we're also big researchers -- with limited budgets, we don't like to have to make costly mistakes if we can avoid it). But I read that those liquid leveller options are more for slight dips. We have dips that are 1/4 deep in some spots. I found this one long dip that is apparently along one of the floor joists that is too low. We considered pulling those planks up, slipping in shims, and putting them back in place, but unfortunately, they glued the floors down so it would break them and we'd have to replace them. I didn't want to replace the floors unless I had to because it would mean that as the new sheets settled, we'd get dips again anyway. Besides...despite the dips, the subfloor is in great shape. No mold anywhere.

    The good thing about us doing it ourselves is that we take more care in how it looks because it's our house as opposed to a contractor who will come in, do it as fast as possible, without any care. My neighbor unfortunately has to fix their own floors because the company they used to install went out of business. I'll post pics when we finish :)

    This guy had an awesome option to fixing dips without liquid levellers.

     
    wontonflip, Jun 19, 2014
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  14. wontonflip

    d2mini VIP Member

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    Ok, phew! :)
     
    d2mini, Jun 19, 2014
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  15. wontonflip

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    The new flooring looks good Gretch.
    But I'll be totally honest, when the wife decided she wanted new floors, I started looking for a good contractor. I ain't no floor man, too much work involved.
     
    yote, Jun 20, 2014
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  16. wontonflip

    wontonflip I failed Kobayashi Maru

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    It's coming together! Taking a while because we only had time to do it on the weekends and I was out of town for one of those weekends. We flip flopped about levelling. Fixed one dip by putting thin plywood, and other smaller dips using sand. The sand worked perfectly! We covered it with moisture barrier that we stapled down to keep the sand I place, then placed the main moisture barrier on top. Can't even hear the sand.

    [​IMG]

    Jack likes it lol

    [​IMG]
     
    wontonflip, Jul 3, 2014
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  17. wontonflip

    ErinCahir Sausage Wrangler

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    Looks great!!
     
    ErinCahir, Jul 3, 2014
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  18. wontonflip

    ReeferRob

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    I like it, we're gonna be putting down some sort of flooring in the new reef room once the walls and ceiling are done this weekend.
     
    ReeferRob, Jul 5, 2014
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  19. wontonflip

    Becky Administrator

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    That looks great, nice work :thumbsup:
     
    Becky, Jul 6, 2014
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  20. wontonflip

    wontonflip I failed Kobayashi Maru

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    Thanks! This turned out nice. Long process but we are learning a lot and I'm learning to use power tools lol. About to dive into the stairs this week. I know we have to glue it down. We are trying to find the best way to cut the stair noses without damaging the design.

    We have had very little waste. Even pieces we messed up in cutting can be used. We just use it where smaller pieces are needed and trim off the bad cuts. Even the dead pieces where we cut off both clickable ends can be used for the stairs.
     
    wontonflip, Jul 6, 2014
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