Clownfish Babies

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by Fishboy, Dec 1, 2009.

  1. Fishboy

    Fishboy

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    My clownfish laid eggs, so what am i supposed to do? Let them sit in the tank till they hatch? What do i needd to do?
     
    Fishboy, Dec 1, 2009
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  2. Fishboy

    HeavyHittah LivingReefs is like home

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    what all else do you have in the tank? anything that can eat them? if you want to keep them, i would think that you would need to start up another tank so you can care for them properly. but im just a noob, a seasoned Vet will chime in
     
    HeavyHittah, Dec 2, 2009
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  3. Fishboy

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    Baby clowns go through a a larval platonic stage where their basically just zooplankton for a while.Just leave the eggs alone and think of em as free fish and coral food.
    What the fish and corals dont eat,the filtration and powerheads will get.
     
    yote, Dec 2, 2009
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  4. Fishboy

    AlwaysImproving

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    Yea, if you want to keep them you are going to have to start a new breeder tank. I searched for this a while back and found a detailed step by step instruction guide, I'll post the link once I find it again.
     
    AlwaysImproving, Dec 2, 2009
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  5. Fishboy

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    Unfortunately, there's very little chance any of them will survive. Pretty much every other thing in the tank will eat them, and they will get sucked up in the filtration.
     
    Bifferwine, Dec 2, 2009
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  6. Fishboy

    Fishboy

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    if they were to hatch...what would i feed them?...they are not in a reef tank right now only in a 30 gallon with the parent clownfish.
     
    Fishboy, Dec 2, 2009
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  7. Fishboy

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    They eat bacterplankton when their that small.
     
    yote, Dec 2, 2009
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  8. Fishboy

    dcantucson

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    I would recommend taking them out and sitting on them until the hatch. They'll be safe that way. :mrgreen:
     
    dcantucson, Dec 2, 2009
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  9. Fishboy

    Fishboy

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    oh wow...
     
    Fishboy, Dec 2, 2009
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  10. Fishboy

    Fishboy

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    where can i get this bacterplankton
     
    Fishboy, Dec 2, 2009
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  11. Fishboy

    Fishboy

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    Fishboy, Dec 2, 2009
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  12. Fishboy

    ccCapt Reef Hacker Moderator

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    This should help you see how much work is involved in trying to raise clownfish fry.

    Advanced Aquarist's Online Magazine - Aquarium Fish: Reproduction and rearing of ocellaris clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) in captivity.
    "Anemone fish larvae have a yolk sac that provides them nourishment for at least 12 hours. Since they hatch at night, we added live food in the morning. At that moment the mouth is opened, eyes dark and larvae are ready to be fed, a huge difference from other sea fish species that need some days to develop and ready to be fed, as sea bream or sea bass. In nature, larvae feed on marine plankton. In captivity we used rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis). Rotifers are microscopic animals that are part of natural marine plankton, and due to their size and their relative easy culture they are widely used in marine aquaculture.
    We used the “green water” method to rear the larvae. In this case phytoplankton is added to the rearing tank. Microalgae contributes to the development of the larvae: whether it’s the darkened tank and avoiding larvae light stress, or improving water quality, or because the microalgae is said to be antibacterial or even allows the rotifers to continue with enrichment until eaten by the larvae. Although to add rotifers during 12 days is enough we added them during 25 days to allow the smallest larvae to be fed. With the larvae grown, about day 5, we began to add naupli of artemia, along with rotifers, and little by little bigger sized artemia were added. Finally dry food can be added, always in combination with rotifer and artemia until the larvae are able to eat dry food without problem, about one month later. We wanted to have a rotifer density of about 15 rot/mal and 0.75-1 artemia/ml in the raring tank to ensure that the larvae will have a better change of catching their prey."
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2009
    ccCapt, Dec 2, 2009
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