Coral Basics (long post)

Discussion in 'Corals' started by andysgirl8800, Aug 2, 2009.

  1. andysgirl8800

    andysgirl8800 Blenny Badlands

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    Hi everyone. Sorry for the long post, but I hope y'all can help me with some basic coral information. I've been reading, and reading, and reading some more (BTW, my local library SUCKS for marine aquarium books), and I seem to be getting some conflicting information.

    I am reading about proper coral acclimation and have read about the drip acclimation method as well as the iodine dipping process, and also see that some of you don't do either for your new corals. My LFS advised me to only do a temperature acclimatino, then place directly into the tank, while LiveAquaria.com reccommends the drip acclimation process for ALL livestock. Does it all boil down to a matter of preference? Do some corals benefit more than others from a specific acclimation process?

    Which brings me to light acclimation. Should all corals be acclimated to my own tank lights? Is there a different process for corals that are purchased from my LFS vs. mail order vs. another aquarist's tank? If you are gradually moving the coral up to where you eventually want it to sit, do you also adjust the watter current/flow each time? If a coral's intended location is at the bottom of the tank, should it sit in the "shade" first?

    I've also been reading quite a bit about splitting and fragging corals. I understand it is a good way to propogate new growth and possibly help control coral overgrowth. Are there any articles, sites, or books that address fragging specifically? Will any coral be damaged or become unhealthy for NOT fragging/splitting it?

    Speaking of frags, what is the best way to place new coral pieces into my tank? I've read that some of you prefer loose corals, not mounted on any rock or plug. One method seems to suggest that new corals be placed/wedged in existing holes or crevices, while some of you use super glue gel or specially formulated coral glue to attach to plugs or rock rubble. Some of you knock the plug methods, while some of you swear by it. Other corals are secured with netting until they take hold on their own. Is this another case of preference, or based on coral requirements? Is there a benefit to a seperate coral staging tank? How do those work? Likewise, how do you secure corals in the substrate?

    Can too many corals be added at the same time? Is there a similar 5 week waiting period between coral additions as there is for fish additions? Finally, could you share any of the tips you've acquired or lessons learned while arranging any of your own coral in your tanks? Though I accept that I will have my own coral trials and tribulations, I'd like to avoid some of the common and more damaging mistakes. Sorry for all the questions, but this has been the most informative and helpful forum I've found out there! Y'all are great and very supportive to all of us newbies out there!
     
    andysgirl8800, Aug 2, 2009
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  2. andysgirl8800

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    You can add 50 corals at once if you want too.They dont produce the bioload that fish do.
     
    yote, Aug 2, 2009
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  3. andysgirl8800

    daugherty part time reefer

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    i always do a temp acclamation as well as add water little by little to the coral and fish to get the sg the same as what my tank is at if you dont you have a chance of shocking and killing the coral or fish. dipping the corals is something i have never done but is a good idea to prevent bad things like flatworms,redbugs, and coral eating nudis. alwasy start a coral out toward the bottom and move it up to where you want over a few weeks. or put it were you want and shorten the photo period to a couple hours and add a 15 min a day until you are back to were it was. you are always going to get conflicting info from different people because that is what has worked for them. not to say they are wrong but everybosy has different methods that work and dont work for their tanks.
     
    daugherty, Aug 2, 2009
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  4. andysgirl8800

    Melosu58

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    What kind of lighting do you have? As far as acclimation I temp acclimate mine and then add about a cup of tank water every 20 minutes. It`s all about whatever works for you.
     
    Melosu58, Aug 2, 2009
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  5. andysgirl8800

    dcantucson

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    + 1 James
    I think most of us do it the way James recommends. Some of us use a coral dip just to be safe. I did in the past or a first, but haven't lately. Gotten lazy, I guess.
     
    dcantucson, Aug 2, 2009
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  6. andysgirl8800

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    I think you should drip acclimate everything you add to your tank, fish and inverts alike. Corals are not like fish, in that they don't contribute to the bioload, so you can add as many as you want at a time.

    Most corals should be acclimated to the light in your tank if they came from a tank with different lighting. You can either start them on the bottom and move them up, or use layer of screens on the top of your tank and remove a screen every couple days to gradually increase the light.

    As for fragging, you can find a lot of good videos on YouTube showing you how to do it. As far as I know, leaving a coral to grow isn't detrimental to them unless they start touching other corals that sting each other, then you may want to frag them to keep them from killing each other.
     
    Bifferwine, Aug 2, 2009
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  7. andysgirl8800

    andysgirl8800 Blenny Badlands

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    Thanks everyone. Does anyone use a seperate coral staging tank?
     
    andysgirl8800, Aug 2, 2009
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  8. andysgirl8800

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    You mean a QT for corals?
    A lot of "Pros" do.But I doubt that 99.9% of us average hobbist do.I know I dont.
     
    yote, Aug 3, 2009
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  9. andysgirl8800

    andysgirl8800 Blenny Badlands

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    Is there anything I should be careful of when putting my corals in?
     
    andysgirl8800, Aug 3, 2009
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  10. andysgirl8800

    Melosu58

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    It`s good to know the flow and lighting requirements of the coral. Also placement in your tank.
     
    Melosu58, Aug 3, 2009
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  11. andysgirl8800

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    +1 Mike
    Be sure to research any corals your interested in.
     
    yote, Aug 3, 2009
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