Feather Duster How to Remove from Rock

Discussion in 'Invertebrates' started by 1geo, Jun 10, 2009.

  1. 1geo

    1geo

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    I have a feather duster who has firmly attached his foot to a rock. Anyone have any suggestions on how to detach the foot without hurting the worm so I can move the feather duster? Any information is appreciated.
     
    1geo, Jun 10, 2009
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  2. 1geo

    mng777777 Shark Wrangler Wannabe

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    I did some reading, and it sounds like it is pretty tough to move one once it's anchored. They use a natural form of adhesive that is said to be like epoxy, and they usually attach themselves in a way that if something attacks their tube they can shed their crown and retreat into the LR. Most accounts I found of people trying to remove them resulted in the removal of an empty tube and the worm remained fixed in the LR. Knowing this, I would suggest either just relocating the whole rock, or attempting to break the piece of the rock that it's attached to with a chisel or bone cutters, then you can just glue the rubble piece wherever you want your feather duster to be. Also know that they shed their crown both out of stress and to reproduce so don't be alarmed if it sends its feathers floating off into the tank. Just leave them.
     
    mng777777, Jun 10, 2009
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  3. 1geo

    daugherty part time reefer

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    more that 9 times out of ten you will kill the worm if you try to remove it from were it has attatched to
     
    daugherty, Jun 10, 2009
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  4. 1geo

    1geo

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    That's what I was afraid of. I have a large Percula who is trying to host the feather duster. The worm wants no part of her and is constantly pulling in her feather duster head. This infuriates the Percula who then bites and butts the the tube of the worm. I then put a bubble anemone next to the worm to try and take the pressure off. To a degree it has worked. Now the Percula is biting and butting the anemone giving the worm a break. Still the Percula is pestering the worm where it rarely comes out. My fear is the worm will starve if it does not come out to eat.
     
    1geo, Jun 10, 2009
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  5. 1geo

    dcantucson

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    Watch that nem!
     
    dcantucson, Jun 10, 2009
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  6. 1geo

    mng777777 Shark Wrangler Wannabe

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    sounds like it might be time to change your aquascaping. Hopefully the change of scenery will force the clown to cool it.
     
    mng777777, Jun 10, 2009
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  7. 1geo

    mng777777 Shark Wrangler Wannabe

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    Hate to say it but he's right. Nems are extremely more delicate than you might think and they need the stable water conditions that only exist in mature tanks of 1+ years. Yours being as new as it is, is not likely to be able to supply the nem with everything it will need to live out it's life to the fullest. They typically die very slowly and often by the time you realize it, it's too late because by the time they look like they aren't going to make it, their tissue will have become too weak to remain intact. If you try to remove them at that point, they fall apart as you touch them, and the toxins in their tissue spread throughout the tank which usually leads to a complete system crash. You might consider sending it back to the LFS now while you can, and waiting several months to a year before you try again with one. Also know that despite what any LFS tells you, they are not reef friendly. Ask Yote about it if you don't believe me.
     
    mng777777, Jun 10, 2009
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  8. 1geo

    dcantucson

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    Damn, Justin's right again!
     
    dcantucson, Jun 10, 2009
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  9. 1geo

    mng777777 Shark Wrangler Wannabe

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    Ironically that is almost exactly a direct quote from the PETJ anthem I have been working on. It's like you are already a member and you just won't admit it...
     
    mng777777, Jun 10, 2009
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  10. 1geo

    1geo

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    The nem is a small, 1.5 inch, aquarium clone and so far is doing well. I purchased it specifically because it was NOT wild stock. I have had nothing but one disaster after another with wild stock. The seller who shipped over night also, unknown to me, included a very small, 1 inch, red - brown bubble tip nem which to my surprise is doing extremely well; it also is an aquarium clone. Never again will I buy wild stock.
     
    1geo, Jun 10, 2009
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  11. 1geo

    mng777777 Shark Wrangler Wannabe

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    I agree with your frustrations with wild stock! I do still urge you to do some research on nems. Though their attitudes and survival rate can be grossly different when they are tank raised vs. wild, an animals' basic survival needs do not change, regardless of where they originated. If you sift through the inverts threads, you will find one after another that start like this, with a mild word of caution, and the OP insists that they are healthy and doing great. I will let you discover the results of those threads on your own...

    Just remember what I said above, death with nems happens slowly and by the time you can visually identify a problem with your nem, it will be too late to remove it.

    I wish you the best of luck!
     
    mng777777, Jun 10, 2009
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  12. 1geo

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    About the small red/brown nem that came along... Google aiptasia and majano to make sure it's not one of those. Both of those are pest anemones, dangerous to the other animals in your tank, and are common hitch hikers. If it is aiptasia or majano, you will need to kill it ASAP.
     
    Bifferwine, Jun 11, 2009
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  13. 1geo

    mng777777 Shark Wrangler Wannabe

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    Didn't even go there Biff, Good catch.
    OP - Post some pics up if you want help with ID.
     
    mng777777, Jun 11, 2009
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  14. 1geo

    dcantucson

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    Yep! I had some pretty snow white ones which I thought were a great freebie! Guess what .... they spread like wildfire! They were aiptasia!
     
    dcantucson, Jun 11, 2009
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  15. 1geo

    mng777777 Shark Wrangler Wannabe

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    sound like they may have been glass nems
     
    mng777777, Jun 11, 2009
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  16. 1geo

    dcantucson

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    None broke when dropped, though! :question:
     
    dcantucson, Jun 11, 2009
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  17. 1geo

    mng777777 Shark Wrangler Wannabe

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    I stand corrected
     
    mng777777, Jun 11, 2009
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