Kent Poly Ox

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by Kelly, Jan 31, 2004.

  1. Kelly

    Kelly Guest

    I have been using this as per directions 3 drops per gallon morning and
    night to try and fight cyno. Has anyone had good or bed experiences with
    this product? So far I haven't really seen an improvement and the cyno is
    coming more rapidly. Presently I remove it by hand.I removed last night and
    now this morning its almost all back and I have a dead emerald crab which
    may be unrelated or not. My tank params are:

    30 gallon
    60 pounds LR
    2 carbon filters (looking at skimmers today)
    65 50/50 PC and a 10 watt (actinic NO)
    2 false percs
    1 mandarin goby
    1 lawnmower blenny
    1 yellowtail damsel
    2 hermits
    2 turbo snails
    5 astrea snails
    1 coralbanded
    1 emerald (now was 2)
    some mushrooms, BTA, star polyps, toadstool, cauliflower & frogspawn.

    I feed a frozen mix usually every 2nd or third day and have bee using Kent
    phytoPlex and Coral accel.
     
    Kelly, Jan 31, 2004
    #1
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  2. Kelly, Cyano bacteria is fueled by nitrates, phosphates, and slow current. Get
    those down and increase your flow.

    You can siphon out cyano with airline tubing, to get it out of your tank.

    Marc


    Kelly wrote:

    > I have been using this as per directions 3 drops per gallon morning and
    > night to try and fight cyno. Has anyone had good or bed experiences with
    > this product? So far I haven't really seen an improvement and the cyno is
    > coming more rapidly. Presently I remove it by hand.I removed last night and
    > now this morning its almost all back and I have a dead emerald crab which
    > may be unrelated or not. My tank params are:
    >
    > 30 gallon
    > 60 pounds LR
    > 2 carbon filters (looking at skimmers today)
    > 65 50/50 PC and a 10 watt (actinic NO)
    > 2 false percs
    > 1 mandarin goby
    > 1 lawnmower blenny
    > 1 yellowtail damsel
    > 2 hermits
    > 2 turbo snails
    > 5 astrea snails
    > 1 coralbanded
    > 1 emerald (now was 2)
    > some mushrooms, BTA, star polyps, toadstool, cauliflower & frogspawn.
    >
    > I feed a frozen mix usually every 2nd or third day and have bee using Kent
    > phytoPlex and Coral accel.


    --
    Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
     
    Marc Levenson, Feb 1, 2004
    #2
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  3. Kelly

    Rod Guest

    Anything that is killing cyanoBACTERIA, will likely kill off benificial
    bacteria that provides denitrification. if there is no (or not much)
    denitrification going on, nitrates build, and fuel the cyano.

    keeping the pH and Alk up via kalk additions will help a bunch. Also as Marc
    pointed out, more current will also help (probably more than anything else)
    keeping nitrates low via water changes and and GOOD protein skimmming. keeping
    the3 temps at a normal temp (80-84) will also help. A salinity of NSW will also
    help (35ppt 0r 1.026-1.027).
    Cyano is heavily related to nitrates, poor salinity, poor current, and _not
    related to phosphate_..
    He is a good link to a post made by Eric Borneman after attending The NCRI
    conference.
    Cyanobacteria have specific chemotypes that can be used to measure bloom
    biodiversity. They are poor indicators of nutrient enrichment and have no
    relationship with phosphate, a negative relationship with Nitrogen/Nitrate, a
    strong negative relationship with salinity, no relationship with other algae
    growth (slightly negative with certain macroalgae (which I asked if it may be
    due to secondary metanbolites acting as antibiotics, to which I discovered that
    was the next course of study), a positive relationship with temperature and a
    strong negative relationship with water motion. They tend to occur in 3 week
    cyclical periods and are grazed, by far, primarily by amphipods and sea hares.
    http://www.reefs.org/library/article/e_borneman4.html

    Rod Buehler
    www.asplashoflife.com
     
    Rod, Feb 2, 2004
    #3
  4. Kelly

    Kelly Guest

    Thanks for all the info Rod the article should be more than enough to get me
    on my way :)
    "Rod" <rbuehler9@cs.com> wrote in message
    news:20040202082955.12686.00001293@mb-m29.news.cs.com...
    > Anything that is killing cyanoBACTERIA, will likely kill off benificial
    > bacteria that provides denitrification. if there is no (or not much)
    > denitrification going on, nitrates build, and fuel the cyano.
    >
    > keeping the pH and Alk up via kalk additions will help a bunch. Also as

    Marc
    > pointed out, more current will also help (probably more than anything

    else)
    > keeping nitrates low via water changes and and GOOD protein skimmming.

    keeping
    > the3 temps at a normal temp (80-84) will also help. A salinity of NSW will

    also
    > help (35ppt 0r 1.026-1.027).
    > Cyano is heavily related to nitrates, poor salinity, poor current, and

    _not
    > related to phosphate_..
    > He is a good link to a post made by Eric Borneman after attending The NCRI
    > conference.
    > Cyanobacteria have specific chemotypes that can be used to measure bloom
    > biodiversity. They are poor indicators of nutrient enrichment and have no
    > relationship with phosphate, a negative relationship with

    Nitrogen/Nitrate, a
    > strong negative relationship with salinity, no relationship with other

    algae
    > growth (slightly negative with certain macroalgae (which I asked if it may

    be
    > due to secondary metanbolites acting as antibiotics, to which I discovered

    that
    > was the next course of study), a positive relationship with temperature

    and a
    > strong negative relationship with water motion. They tend to occur in 3

    week
    > cyclical periods and are grazed, by far, primarily by amphipods and sea

    hares.
    > http://www.reefs.org/library/article/e_borneman4.html
    >
    > Rod Buehler
    > www.asplashoflife.com
     
    Kelly, Feb 2, 2004
    #4
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