Mandarin Dragonet - Green

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by KurtG, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. KurtG

    KurtG Guest

    I added this guy to my tank: http://tinyurl.com/dshws

    But, I've noticed a up swing in turbidity of the water. Sure enough,
    this little guy is putting up a cloud of dust through his *gills*.

    I thought pods would be enough for him, but it seems that I better feed
    him better. Where does one find live worms and brine?

    --Kurt
     
    KurtG, Dec 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. KurtG <kurtguenther@nospambellsouth.net> wrote:

    > I added this guy to my tank: http://tinyurl.com/dshws


    > But, I've noticed a up swing in turbidity of the water. Sure enough,
    > this little guy is putting up a cloud of dust through his *gills*.


    > I thought pods would be enough for him, but it seems that I better feed
    > him better. Where does one find live worms and brine?


    Uh, you need to get a refugium, fast. They'll only reliably eat
    copepods, and only some will eat brine. And you can't expect them
    to eat worms, which will foul the tank.

    Mike
     
    mtfester@netMAPSONscape.net, Dec 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. KurtG

    Don Geddis Guest

    KurtG <kurtguenther@NOSPAMbellsouth.net> wrote on Mon, 04 Dec 2006:
    > I added this guy to my tank: http://tinyurl.com/dshws
    > But, I've noticed a up swing in turbidity of the water. Sure enough, this
    > little guy is putting up a cloud of dust through his *gills*.


    I really doubt this one fish is causing noticable changes to your water
    quality.

    > I thought pods would be enough for him, but it seems that I better feed him
    > better. Where does one find live worms and brine?


    How big is your tank? You really shouldn't have a Dragonet unless you have
    75+ gallon tank, with _mature_ (1+ year) live rock and sand.

    You really need to support a dragonet's food requirements solely through
    a natural population of pods.

    If you're getting into needing to feed the dragonet, then you don't have the
    right tank. It's rarely feasible to provide them regular external food.

    I've got a psychedelic mandarin and a spotted mandarin (separated by a
    partition). The psychedelic one basically ignores my fish feeding. I've seen
    it nibble on a (frozen) brine shrimp or mysis shrimp perhaps once very few
    months or so.

    My spotted mandarin, for some reason, I seem to have gotten lucky. While it
    mostly feeds itself, it seems to regularly snack a bit on (frozen) mysis
    shrimp when I feed the seahorses (in the same tank). My understanding is that
    this is not typical.

    Finally: you have implied a connection between "putting up a cloud of dust",
    and "pods [aren't] enough [...] better feed him better." What's the
    connection? Mandarins doing their regular eating will often spit "dust"
    through their gills. What makes you think this has anything to do with the
    Mandarin being hungry? Or do you have some other observation which suggests
    it isn't getting enough to eat?

    -- Don
    _______________________________________________________________________________
    Don Geddis don@geddis.org http://reef.geddis.org/
    I wish I would have a real tragic love affair and get so bummed out that I'd
    just quit my job and become a bum for a few years, because I was thinking about
    doing that anyway. -- Deep Thoughts, by Jack Handey [1999]
     
    Don Geddis, Dec 4, 2006
    #3
  4. KurtG

    KurtG Guest

    mtfester@netMAPSONscape.net wrote:
    > Uh, you need to get a refugium, fast. They'll only reliably eat
    > copepods, and only some will eat brine. And you can't expect them
    > to eat worms, which will foul the tank.


    Plenty of pods to eat. My live rocks are coated in them.

    Just seems that my water is crystal clear in the morning, but cloudy by
    night time. I didn't notice this before, and the Mandarin is put up
    small clouds of silt while it eats.

    --Kurt
     
    KurtG, Dec 5, 2006
    #4
  5. KurtG

    KurtG Guest

    Don Geddis wrote:
    > How big is your tank? You really shouldn't have a Dragonet unless you have
    > 75+ gallon tank, with _mature_ (1+ year) live rock and sand.


    110 w/ lots of live rock and plenty of pods.

    > Finally: you have implied a connection between "putting up a cloud of dust",
    > and "pods [aren't] enough [...] better feed him better." What's the
    > connection? Mandarins doing their regular eating will often spit "dust"
    > through their gills. What makes you think this has anything to do with the
    > Mandarin being hungry? Or do you have some other observation which suggests
    > it isn't getting enough to eat?


    I was hoping that with live brine or worms maybe it would slow down it's
    pod eating. Not that I mind that it's eating pods, but just the "dust"
    coming out of it's gills.

    I've noticed a difference in turbidity between morning (clear) and
    evening (cloudy). And, I only noticed this after the mandarin was
    introduced to the tank (along w/ coral beauty).

    --Kurt
     
    KurtG, Dec 5, 2006
    #5
  6. KurtG

    Don Geddis Guest

    KurtG <kurtguenther@NOSPAMbellsouth.net> wrote on Tue, 05 Dec 2006:
    > I was hoping that with live brine or worms maybe it would slow down it's pod
    > eating. Not that I mind that it's eating pods, but just the "dust" coming
    > out of it's gills.


    Oh, I see. Yeah, I don't think that theory will work.

    Pretty much all fish prefer to be constant grazers. In the wild they eat
    large volumes of low-nutrition food. We're lucky that most ornamental fish,
    in captivity, can survive on rare (e.g. daily) feedings of high-nutrition
    food. Mostly it's because they don't have any choice.

    But a mandarin is built to spend the whole day constantly scouring the rockwork
    and eating pods. I don't think anything will stop this behavior, even if you
    do manage to find some food to add that it will eat. They just constantly
    forage.

    (All that said, I'm still suspicious that a single mandarin causes visible
    daily changes in water quality in a 110 gallon tank. I suspect that you've
    misidentified the cause of your water clarity problem.)

    -- Don
    _______________________________________________________________________________
    Don Geddis don@geddis.org http://reef.geddis.org/
    It's too bad that the power of tornados cannot be harnessed somehow, and then
    stored, and then released in the form of powerful, swirling winds which could
    somehow be used for useful purposes. -- Deep Thoughts, by Jack Handey [1999]
     
    Don Geddis, Dec 5, 2006
    #6
  7. KurtG

    KurtG Guest

    Don Geddis wrote:
    > (All that said, I'm still suspicious that a single mandarin causes visible
    > daily changes in water quality in a 110 gallon tank. I suspect that you've
    > misidentified the cause of your water clarity problem.)


    In that case, my mandarin is very happy and has adjusted well. There's
    no lack of pods to forage, and s/he does exactly that.

    I'll keep an eye on the water clarity. I'm coming up on a water and
    filter change anyway.

    --Kurt
     
    KurtG, Dec 5, 2006
    #7
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