Newbie question - Minimum size of a saltwater tank

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by James Cheung, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. James Cheung

    James Cheung Guest

    Hello folks,

    Happy new year first of all. My wife and I have decided to set up a new
    salt-water tank in our living room. Since I'm totally new with the marine
    tank, I have some questions and hopefully you pros can help me out.

    1. Petco is selling a 12 gallon tank complete with all the salt-water
    accessories that need to get me started (salt, meters, filter, net, testing
    equipments). However, I heard people saying that setting up a salt-water
    tank for less than 30 gallon is waste of time because small tanks tend to
    have less buffer than a bigger tank. Is this true? Or it¹s just a myth?
    2. If 12-gallon tank is too small, what¹d be the minimum size that I should
    consider? Granted I will monitor the water in a daily basis, but there will
    be times that I go on vacation and might need my tank unattended for a week
    or two.
    3. I understand that after I have setup the tank initially, I should leave
    the water and filtration system running for at least two weeks. What are
    some of the things that I should be aware of during this period, or before I
    start setting things up?
    4. Aside from the hanging type of filter it comes with the Petco package (if
    I go for the 12 gallon option), should I get additional filters to keep the
    water cleaned and stabilized at all time? If so, what type or brand that
    you¹d recommend.

    Thanks in advance for your help. Cheers.

    - James
     
    James Cheung, Jan 2, 2006
    #1
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  2. James Cheung

    Samwyse Guest

    At a New Year's party, I ran into the guy who "lent" me one of his big
    saltwater tanks when he got evicted from his house. Looks like the tank
    is now officially mine for as long was I want to keep it, because he's
    moving into a studio apartment and will only have room for a couple of
    nano-tanks. So...

    James Cheung wrote:
    > 1. Petco is selling a 12 gallon tank complete with all the salt-water
    > accessories that need to get me started (salt, meters, filter,
    > net, testing equipments). However, I heard people saying that
    > setting up a salt-water tank for less than 30 gallon is waste of
    > time because small tanks tend to have less buffer than a bigger
    > tank. Is this true? Or it’s just a myth?


    Obviously, my acquantence believes he can keep a couple going. Of
    course, he previously owned at least a dozen 55 gallon tanks, so I
    presume that he knows what he's doing. He did say that he'll be
    changing the water weekly instead of every month or two, and that he's
    trying to figure out how to hook up an RO filter in the apartment to
    provide all the distilled water he'll be needing.

    You'll also be needed four to eight times as much salt if you're
    swapping water that often. You might want to run a cost comparison over
    a year or two instead of just looking at the initial costs. For
    example, swapping out 1/3rd of the water every week means you'll need
    about 200 gallons/year. I'd estimate $50 if you buy salt in quantity
    on-line, and $150 for distilled water bought 1 gallon at a time from the
    grocery store.

    > 2. If 12-gallon tank is too small, what’d be the minimum size that I
    > should consider? Granted I will monitor the water in a daily
    > basis, but there will be times that I go on vacation and might
    > need my tank unattended for a week or two.


    As long as you swap your water immediately before leaving and upon your
    return, you should be OK. Obviously, one week away would be better for
    your tank than two.
     
    Samwyse, Jan 2, 2006
    #2
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  3. James Cheung

    Roy Guest

    I personally as well as a lot of other afficionados of PICO tanks do
    not belive there is such a thing as too small. I have a bunch of PICO
    tanks from 2 pints to 2 gal in size and they all do just fine. SOme
    have all the bells and whistles any other larger fully equipped tank
    would have and some only get basic water changes once a week....Only
    concern is temperature.

    There is certainly nothing wrong with a 12 gal setup. IS it the
    Eclipse Marine Setup? If so, its good to go like it is without any
    additional filters....however if your wanting to put mushrooms and
    some other corals that are suitable for the light it comes with then
    you really need to change the bulb out....but for a fish only its
    fine.

    Eclipse makes a 1 tube and a two tube hood and the two tube is
    definately a better choice........

    I don;t know what petco price is on their 12 gal so called acrylic
    tank, which really is not acrylic but a clear injection molded styrene
    type plastic, but with the MArineland Eclipses my LFS sells they just
    sub a 10 gal All Glass tank in its place....and offer it in kit form
    with all the necessary accessories for $99.00 and offer the larger
    Eclipse III setup complete with all things down to so many pounds of
    LR and sand etc and salt etc etc for $149.00

    Have you seen the Aqua Pod 12 gal and 24 gal.....They contain
    everything needed but what you put inside in the line of fish and rock
    and are a very good deal.

    Another super setup that is a complete NANO setup is the Finnex M
    tank....Lists for a complete setup for about $239.00 and is a complete
    package ready to put your critters in. But there is nothing wrong with
    the 12 GAl; setup if its the Marineland Eclipse system........It will
    give you experience with saltwater without a ot of money laid out and
    it can always be used as a quarantine tank if yu ever go
    bigger.....Just be aware..saltwater fish keeping is much more
    expensive and much much more addictive than freshwater is........



    On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 20:40:51 GMT, James Cheung <jcgoobee@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    >><>Hello folks,
    >><>
    >><>Happy new year first of all. My wife and I have decided to set up a new
    >><>salt-water tank in our living room. Since I'm totally new with the marine
    >><>tank, I have some questions and hopefully you pros can help me out.
    >><>
    >><>1. Petco is selling a 12 gallon tank complete with all the salt-water
    >><>accessories that need to get me started (salt, meters, filter, net, testing
    >><>equipments). However, I heard people saying that setting up a salt-water
    >><>tank for less than 30 gallon is waste of time because small tanks tend to
    >><>have less buffer than a bigger tank. Is this true? Or it¹s just a myth?
    >><>2. If 12-gallon tank is too small, what¹d be the minimum size that I should
    >><>consider? Granted I will monitor the water in a daily basis, but there will
    >><>be times that I go on vacation and might need my tank unattended for a week
    >><>or two.
    >><>3. I understand that after I have setup the tank initially, I should leave
    >><>the water and filtration system running for at least two weeks. What are
    >><>some of the things that I should be aware of during this period, or before I
    >><>start setting things up?
    >><>4. Aside from the hanging type of filter it comes with the Petco package (if
    >><>I go for the 12 gallon option), should I get additional filters to keep the
    >><>water cleaned and stabilized at all time? If so, what type or brand that
    >><>you¹d recommend.
    >><>
    >><>Thanks in advance for your help. Cheers.
    >><>
    >><>- James


    --
    \\\|///
    ( @ @ )
    -----------oOOo(_)oOOo---------------


    oooO
    ---------( )----Oooo----------------
    \ ( ( )
    \_) ) /
    (_/
    The original frugal ponder! Koi-ahoi mates....
     
    Roy, Jan 3, 2006
    #3
  4. James Cheung

    James Cheung Guest

    Hi Roy,

    Wow! Thanks so much for your insights. The one I saw at Petco is Eclipse
    branded. I'm not too sure about the price but I don't think they would
    charge an arm and a leg since they have many other competitors.

    The main reason I was a bit concern about the size of the tank is, that I
    live in 900 square feet town house, and I don't have much room to place this
    precious salt-water tank on.

    I heard of the Nano tank and I have asked a guy who works in the aquarium
    shop about it. His response was, Nano tank is for someone who has extensive
    knowledge of salt-water system and be able to monitor the water all the
    time. This discourages me from getting one.

    I don't plan on getting any anemones (not sure if this is what you call it)
    or huge amount of fish in the tank anyway. 6 to 10 small, yet colorful fish
    in there will be more than what I can dream of having. I never heard of Aqua
    Pod at all, but will definitely do some research after writing up this
    message.

    Now, let's say I want to go with the Eclipse 12 gallon tank option. At the
    beginning, should I get some live coral rocks to raise some good bacteria?
    Or I should get a couple of damsel fish?

    Again, thanks a lot for your time in responding. Cheers.

    - James




    On 1/2/06 4:21 PM, in article 43b9c10e.37343335@news.east.earthlink.net,
    "Roy" <Sonoma1720@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > I personally as well as a lot of other afficionados of PICO tanks do
    > not belive there is such a thing as too small. I have a bunch of PICO
    > tanks from 2 pints to 2 gal in size and they all do just fine. SOme
    > have all the bells and whistles any other larger fully equipped tank
    > would have and some only get basic water changes once a week....Only
    > concern is temperature.
    >
    > There is certainly nothing wrong with a 12 gal setup. IS it the
    > Eclipse Marine Setup? If so, its good to go like it is without any
    > additional filters....however if your wanting to put mushrooms and
    > some other corals that are suitable for the light it comes with then
    > you really need to change the bulb out....but for a fish only its
    > fine.
    >
    > Eclipse makes a 1 tube and a two tube hood and the two tube is
    > definately a better choice........
    >
    > I don;t know what petco price is on their 12 gal so called acrylic
    > tank, which really is not acrylic but a clear injection molded styrene
    > type plastic, but with the MArineland Eclipses my LFS sells they just
    > sub a 10 gal All Glass tank in its place....and offer it in kit form
    > with all the necessary accessories for $99.00 and offer the larger
    > Eclipse III setup complete with all things down to so many pounds of
    > LR and sand etc and salt etc etc for $149.00
    >
    > Have you seen the Aqua Pod 12 gal and 24 gal.....They contain
    > everything needed but what you put inside in the line of fish and rock
    > and are a very good deal.
    >
    > Another super setup that is a complete NANO setup is the Finnex M
    > tank....Lists for a complete setup for about $239.00 and is a complete
    > package ready to put your critters in. But there is nothing wrong with
    > the 12 GAl; setup if its the Marineland Eclipse system........It will
    > give you experience with saltwater without a ot of money laid out and
    > it can always be used as a quarantine tank if yu ever go
    > bigger.....Just be aware..saltwater fish keeping is much more
    > expensive and much much more addictive than freshwater is........
    >
    >
    >
    > On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 20:40:51 GMT, James Cheung <jcgoobee@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >>> <>Hello folks,
    >>> <>
    >>> <>Happy new year first of all. My wife and I have decided to set up a new
    >>> <>salt-water tank in our living room. Since I'm totally new with the marine
    >>> <>tank, I have some questions and hopefully you pros can help me out.
    >>> <>
    >>> <>1. Petco is selling a 12 gallon tank complete with all the salt-water
    >>> <>accessories that need to get me started (salt, meters, filter, net,
    >>> testing
    >>> <>equipments). However, I heard people saying that setting up a salt-water
    >>> <>tank for less than 30 gallon is waste of time because small tanks tend to
    >>> <>have less buffer than a bigger tank. Is this true? Or it¹s just a myth?
    >>> <>2. If 12-gallon tank is too small, what¹d be the minimum size that I
    >>> should
    >>> <>consider? Granted I will monitor the water in a daily basis, but there
    >>> will
    >>> <>be times that I go on vacation and might need my tank unattended for a
    >>> week
    >>> <>or two.
    >>> <>3. I understand that after I have setup the tank initially, I should leave
    >>> <>the water and filtration system running for at least two weeks. What are
    >>> <>some of the things that I should be aware of during this period, or before
    >>> I
    >>> <>start setting things up?
    >>> <>4. Aside from the hanging type of filter it comes with the Petco package
    >>> (if
    >>> <>I go for the 12 gallon option), should I get additional filters to keep
    >>> the
    >>> <>water cleaned and stabilized at all time? If so, what type or brand that
    >>> <>you¹d recommend.
    >>> <>
    >>> <>Thanks in advance for your help. Cheers.
    >>> <>
    >>> <>- James
     
    James Cheung, Jan 3, 2006
    #4
  5. James Cheung

    James Cheung Guest

    Hi Sam,

    First of all, thanks for the feedback and they're quite useful. I'm not sure
    if it's a true statement that, swapping water too frequently (more twice a
    month) is bad for the tank since by doing so, will also destroy the balanced
    water within. Just wondering.

    - James


    On 1/2/06 2:45 PM, in article
    v2iuf.44469$7h7.16263@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com, "Samwyse"
    <samwyse@gmail.com> wrote:

    > At a New Year's party, I ran into the guy who "lent" me one of his big
    > saltwater tanks when he got evicted from his house. Looks like the tank
    > is now officially mine for as long was I want to keep it, because he's
    > moving into a studio apartment and will only have room for a couple of
    > nano-tanks. So...
    >
    > James Cheung wrote:
    >> 1. Petco is selling a 12 gallon tank complete with all the salt-water
    >> accessories that need to get me started (salt, meters, filter,
    >> net, testing equipments). However, I heard people saying that
    >> setting up a salt-water tank for less than 30 gallon is waste of
    >> time because small tanks tend to have less buffer than a bigger
    >> tank. Is this true? Or it¹s just a myth?

    >
    > Obviously, my acquantence believes he can keep a couple going. Of
    > course, he previously owned at least a dozen 55 gallon tanks, so I
    > presume that he knows what he's doing. He did say that he'll be
    > changing the water weekly instead of every month or two, and that he's
    > trying to figure out how to hook up an RO filter in the apartment to
    > provide all the distilled water he'll be needing.
    >
    > You'll also be needed four to eight times as much salt if you're
    > swapping water that often. You might want to run a cost comparison over
    > a year or two instead of just looking at the initial costs. For
    > example, swapping out 1/3rd of the water every week means you'll need
    > about 200 gallons/year. I'd estimate $50 if you buy salt in quantity
    > on-line, and $150 for distilled water bought 1 gallon at a time from the
    > grocery store.
    >
    >> 2. If 12-gallon tank is too small, what¹d be the minimum size that I
    >> should consider? Granted I will monitor the water in a daily
    >> basis, but there will be times that I go on vacation and might
    >> need my tank unattended for a week or two.

    >
    > As long as you swap your water immediately before leaving and upon your
    > return, you should be OK. Obviously, one week away would be better for
    > your tank than two.
     
    James Cheung, Jan 3, 2006
    #5
  6. James Cheung

    Roy Guest

    On Tue, 03 Jan 2006 03:01:15 GMT, James Cheung <jcgoobee@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    >><>Hi Roy,
    >><>
    >><>Wow! Thanks so much for your insights. The one I saw at Petco is Eclipse
    >><>branded. I'm not too sure about the price but I don't think they would
    >><>charge an arm and a leg since they have many other competitors.


    Around this part of the country Petco is the highest priced place to
    buy any aquariums or accessories.....Their fish are cheap though.
    >><>
    >><>The main reason I was a bit concern about the size of the tank is, that I
    >><>live in 900 square feet town house, and I don't have much room to place this
    >><>precious salt-water tank on.
    >><>
    >><>I heard of the Nano tank and I have asked a guy who works in the aquarium
    >><>shop about it. His response was, Nano tank is for someone who has extensive
    >><>knowledge of salt-water system and be able to monitor the water all the
    >><>time. This discourages me from getting one.


    I would seriously steer away from the JBJ brand of NANO cube. They
    have had nothing but problems with glass cracking. The NANO-cube forum
    is full of disgusted NANO cube owners that have lost lots of money in
    their investment, and even though JBJ may have replaced the cubes, the
    replacements have been no better.

    >><>
    >><>I don't plan on getting any anemones (not sure if this is what you call it)
    >><>or huge amount of fish in the tank anyway. 6 to 10 small, yet colorful fish
    >><>in there will be more than what I can dream of having. I never heard of Aqua
    >><>Pod at all, but will definitely do some research after writing up this
    >><>message.

    Aqua Pod is made by Current, USA. A major player in the aquarium and
    accessories producers. They basically came out with a clone of the JBJ
    NANO cube in response to the market for such a sized tank, and the
    problems JBJ had, they decided to give it a try......Its a bit early
    in the game to give their cube a fair assumption as to quality etc,
    but from what I read and hear, its much more favorable than the NANO
    by JBJ is......only time will tell.
    >><>
    >><>Now, let's say I want to go with the Eclipse 12 gallon tank option. At the
    >><>beginning, should I get some live coral rocks to raise some good bacteria?
    >><>Or I should get a couple of damsel fish?
    >><>

    If your intending to make a reef with live rock used primarily as your
    main filtration stock it with good quality live rock at the rate of
    1.5# per gall size......along with a sand bed of a depth no more than
    3/4 to 1" deep......Give it time to cycle, which could be as short as
    a week or less or a month or two, depends entirely on condition and
    quality of your liverock and sand. My LFS sells top quality and its
    possible to start adding fish within 3 to 5 days as all his sand and
    rock is fully cured, before he sells it...

    Damsels will get big.......The big reason folks recomend them is to
    "test" their water parameters and if they do loose a fish they are not
    out all that much. Petco sells all kinds of Damsels for
    $3.50........but I will not add one to a small tank.......The way I
    look at it is if my water checks good, and things are how they are
    suposed to be, there is no harm in putting in a $2.00 fish or a $50
    fish, it should live if I do my part, so I don;t go with the concept
    of using a cheap fish which is oging to outgrow that tank in short
    order to test the waters or my abiity.

    Neon Goby, Small clowns, Firefish, cleaner shrimp etc are all good
    candidates for a small tank. Your live rock and sand once cycled will
    provide the necessry beneficial bacteria. Then add one fish at a time.
    Allow a week or so between each addition of fish for bio load to
    safely keep up and acclimate to added inhabitants. Corals and inverts
    can basically be added once the tank is cycled. If you have good live
    rock adding a fish to get thing started is not needed, but if usuing
    poorer quality rock you can always add a piece of shrimp to get
    ammonia etc started to do its thing, not a live fish. I'm sure there
    will be different views but thats what I always do and what I have
    been shown to do and its worked just fine.

    Now if you r just interested in fish and no corals etc, things can get
    a lot easier and cheaper, and you can just have a bare bottom tank add
    saltwater and fish the same day.......but its the natural look with
    sand and rock and corals and all the other critters like a shimp and
    snails and hermits that make a tank look great.

    If its at all possioble find your Live rock and sand locally so you
    can see what your getting. Live rock and live sand is basically the
    heart and soul of a tank.

    >><>Again, thanks a lot for your time in responding. Cheers.
    >><>
    >><>- James
    >><>
    >><>
    >><>
    >><>
    >><>On 1/2/06 4:21 PM, in article 43b9c10e.37343335@news.east.earthlink.net,
    >><>"Roy" <Sonoma1720@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >><>
    >><>> I personally as well as a lot of other afficionados of PICO tanks do
    >><>> not belive there is such a thing as too small. I have a bunch of PICO
    >><>> tanks from 2 pints to 2 gal in size and they all do just fine. SOme
    >><>> have all the bells and whistles any other larger fully equipped tank
    >><>> would have and some only get basic water changes once a week....Only
    >><>> concern is temperature.
    >><>>
    >><>> There is certainly nothing wrong with a 12 gal setup. IS it the
    >><>> Eclipse Marine Setup? If so, its good to go like it is without any
    >><>> additional filters....however if your wanting to put mushrooms and
    >><>> some other corals that are suitable for the light it comes with then
    >><>> you really need to change the bulb out....but for a fish only its
    >><>> fine.
    >><>>
    >><>> Eclipse makes a 1 tube and a two tube hood and the two tube is
    >><>> definately a better choice........
    >><>>
    >><>> I don;t know what petco price is on their 12 gal so called acrylic
    >><>> tank, which really is not acrylic but a clear injection molded styrene
    >><>> type plastic, but with the MArineland Eclipses my LFS sells they just
    >><>> sub a 10 gal All Glass tank in its place....and offer it in kit form
    >><>> with all the necessary accessories for $99.00 and offer the larger
    >><>> Eclipse III setup complete with all things down to so many pounds of
    >><>> LR and sand etc and salt etc etc for $149.00
    >><>>
    >><>> Have you seen the Aqua Pod 12 gal and 24 gal.....They contain
    >><>> everything needed but what you put inside in the line of fish and rock
    >><>> and are a very good deal.
    >><>>
    >><>> Another super setup that is a complete NANO setup is the Finnex M
    >><>> tank....Lists for a complete setup for about $239.00 and is a complete
    >><>> package ready to put your critters in. But there is nothing wrong with
    >><>> the 12 GAl; setup if its the Marineland Eclipse system........It will
    >><>> give you experience with saltwater without a ot of money laid out and
    >><>> it can always be used as a quarantine tank if yu ever go
    >><>> bigger.....Just be aware..saltwater fish keeping is much more
    >><>> expensive and much much more addictive than freshwater is........
    >><>>
    >><>>
    >><>>
    >><>> On Mon, 02 Jan 2006 20:40:51 GMT, James Cheung <jcgoobee@gmail.com>
    >><>> wrote:
    >><>>>> <>Hello folks,
    >><>>>> <>
    >><>>>> <>Happy new year first of all. My wife and I have decided to set up a new
    >><>>>> <>salt-water tank in our living room. Since I'm totally new with the marine
    >><>>>> <>tank, I have some questions and hopefully you pros can help me out.
    >><>>>> <>
    >><>>>> <>1. Petco is selling a 12 gallon tank complete with all the salt-water
    >><>>>> <>accessories that need to get me started (salt, meters, filter, net,
    >><>>>> testing
    >><>>>> <>equipments). However, I heard people saying that setting up a salt-water
    >><>>>> <>tank for less than 30 gallon is waste of time because small tanks tend to
    >><>>>> <>have less buffer than a bigger tank. Is this true? Or it¹s just a myth?
    >><>>>> <>2. If 12-gallon tank is too small, what¹d be the minimum size that I
    >><>>>> should
    >><>>>> <>consider? Granted I will monitor the water in a daily basis, but there
    >><>>>> will
    >><>>>> <>be times that I go on vacation and might need my tank unattended for a
    >><>>>> week
    >><>>>> <>or two.
    >><>>>> <>3. I understand that after I have setup the tank initially, I should leave
    >><>>>> <>the water and filtration system running for at least two weeks. What are
    >><>>>> <>some of the things that I should be aware of during this period, or before
    >><>>>> I
    >><>>>> <>start setting things up?
    >><>>>> <>4. Aside from the hanging type of filter it comes with the Petco package
    >><>>>> (if
    >><>>>> <>I go for the 12 gallon option), should I get additional filters to keep
    >><>>>> the
    >><>>>> <>water cleaned and stabilized at all time? If so, what type or brand that
    >><>>>> <>you¹d recommend.
    >><>>>> <>
    >><>>>> <>Thanks in advance for your help. Cheers.
    >><>>>> <>
    >><>>>> <>- James


    --
    \\\|///
    ( @ @ )
    -----------oOOo(_)oOOo---------------


    oooO
    ---------( )----Oooo----------------
    \ ( ( )
    \_) ) /
    (_/
    The original frugal ponder! Koi-ahoi mates....
     
    Roy, Jan 3, 2006
    #6
  7. James Cheung

    Roy Guest

    Water changes never hurt a thing.......and twice a month is not
    uncommon time frame. A tank will get surface film and other buiilt up
    junk, and only water changes remove it. Water changes also rejuvinates
    trace minerals used by the inhabitants. and reduces or dilutes any
    buildup of undesireable things a filter and live rock does not remove.
    As long a SG and temp are the same the amount of water changed will
    not have any dire effects and only promote a healthier tank overall.
    I do weekly water changes on some of my smaller pico tanks and on my
    tiny tiny micro pico without any form of filtration other than a piece
    of LR and LS every other day or two it gets a 10% water change.

    On Tue, 03 Jan 2006 03:05:50 GMT, James Cheung <jcgoobee@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    >><>Hi Sam,
    >><>
    >><>First of all, thanks for the feedback and they're quite useful. I'm not sure
    >><>if it's a true statement that, swapping water too frequently (more twice a
    >><>month) is bad for the tank since by doing so, will also destroy the balanced
    >><>water within. Just wondering.
    >><>
    >><>- James
    >><>
    >><>
    >><>On 1/2/06 2:45 PM, in article
    >><>v2iuf.44469$7h7.16263@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com, "Samwyse"
    >><><samwyse@gmail.com> wrote:
    >><>
    >><>> At a New Year's party, I ran into the guy who "lent" me one of his big
    >><>> saltwater tanks when he got evicted from his house. Looks like the tank
    >><>> is now officially mine for as long was I want to keep it, because he's
    >><>> moving into a studio apartment and will only have room for a couple of
    >><>> nano-tanks. So...
    >><>>
    >><>> James Cheung wrote:
    >><>>> 1. Petco is selling a 12 gallon tank complete with all the salt-water
    >><>>> accessories that need to get me started (salt, meters, filter,
    >><>>> net, testing equipments). However, I heard people saying that
    >><>>> setting up a salt-water tank for less than 30 gallon is waste of
    >><>>> time because small tanks tend to have less buffer than a bigger
    >><>>> tank. Is this true? Or it¹s just a myth?
    >><>>
    >><>> Obviously, my acquantence believes he can keep a couple going. Of
    >><>> course, he previously owned at least a dozen 55 gallon tanks, so I
    >><>> presume that he knows what he's doing. He did say that he'll be
    >><>> changing the water weekly instead of every month or two, and that he's
    >><>> trying to figure out how to hook up an RO filter in the apartment to
    >><>> provide all the distilled water he'll be needing.
    >><>>
    >><>> You'll also be needed four to eight times as much salt if you're
    >><>> swapping water that often. You might want to run a cost comparison over
    >><>> a year or two instead of just looking at the initial costs. For
    >><>> example, swapping out 1/3rd of the water every week means you'll need
    >><>> about 200 gallons/year. I'd estimate $50 if you buy salt in quantity
    >><>> on-line, and $150 for distilled water bought 1 gallon at a time from the
    >><>> grocery store.
    >><>>
    >><>>> 2. If 12-gallon tank is too small, what¹d be the minimum size that I
    >><>>> should consider? Granted I will monitor the water in a daily
    >><>>> basis, but there will be times that I go on vacation and might
    >><>>> need my tank unattended for a week or two.
    >><>>
    >><>> As long as you swap your water immediately before leaving and upon your
    >><>> return, you should be OK. Obviously, one week away would be better for
    >><>> your tank than two.


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    The original frugal ponder! Koi-ahoi mates....
     
    Roy, Jan 3, 2006
    #7
  8. James Cheung

    unclenorm Guest

    Hi James,
    I don't want to get into the tank size question, but I
    feel i must say that a twelve gall. tank is only big enough for two
    small fish three would be bordering on overcrowding, the rule of thumb
    is 1" of fish for every 5 galls. of water. I will add that a small tank
    can be wiped out in a matter of hours, probably before you even know
    you have a problem, so for a newby big is much easier to manage and
    correct problems.
    regards,
    unclenorm.
     
    unclenorm, Jan 6, 2006
    #8
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