Red Hair Algae

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by Kelly, Jan 24, 2004.

  1. Kelly

    Kelly Guest

    I have an outbreak of red hair algae. I just did a 15% water change with RO
    water. Could this be why? Or is it because I only have:

    2 turbo snails
    1 sandsifter
    2 hermits
    1 emerald crab

    As my clean up crew?

    30 gallon tank
    0 ammonia
    8.6 ph
    0 nitrates
    1 percula
    1 lawnmower goby
    1 mandarin
    1 blue damsel
    1 urchin
    1 coral band
    1 peppermint(that I haven't seen in over a week)
     
    Kelly, Jan 24, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Hi Kelly,

    It could be a combination of things. Overfeeding, underskimming, excess
    phosphates.....

    Your sand sifting starfish is eating the beneficial bacteria and microfauna your
    sand bed needs to be a healthy deep sand bed. Plus you've got a mandarin that
    eats those same bugs. Once your sand bed is dead / lifeless, you'll have quite
    a bit of nuisance algae growing on your substrate and rockwork.

    If you've got a refugium with macro algae connected to your system, it will help
    prevent microalgae growth.

    Marc


    Kelly wrote:

    > I have an outbreak of red hair algae. I just did a 15% water change with RO
    > water. Could this be why? Or is it because I only have:
    >
    > 2 turbo snails
    > 1 sandsifter
    > 2 hermits
    > 1 emerald crab
    >
    > As my clean up crew?
    >
    > 30 gallon tank
    > 0 ammonia
    > 8.6 ph
    > 0 nitrates
    > 1 percula
    > 1 lawnmower goby
    > 1 mandarin
    > 1 blue damsel
    > 1 urchin
    > 1 coral band
    > 1 peppermint(that I haven't seen in over a week)


    --
    Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
     
    Marc Levenson, Jan 24, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Kelly

    Kelly Guest

    So the sand sifting snail is bad? I thought I needed him to mix it up.
    "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message
    news:401211F5.2EBC5259@swbell.net...
    > Hi Kelly,
    >
    > It could be a combination of things. Overfeeding, underskimming, excess
    > phosphates.....
    >
    > Your sand sifting starfish is eating the beneficial bacteria and

    microfauna your
    > sand bed needs to be a healthy deep sand bed. Plus you've got a mandarin

    that
    > eats those same bugs. Once your sand bed is dead / lifeless, you'll have

    quite
    > a bit of nuisance algae growing on your substrate and rockwork.
    >
    > If you've got a refugium with macro algae connected to your system, it

    will help
    > prevent microalgae growth.
    >
    > Marc
    >
    >
    > Kelly wrote:
    >
    > > I have an outbreak of red hair algae. I just did a 15% water change with

    RO
    > > water. Could this be why? Or is it because I only have:
    > >
    > > 2 turbo snails
    > > 1 sandsifter
    > > 2 hermits
    > > 1 emerald crab
    > >
    > > As my clean up crew?
    > >
    > > 30 gallon tank
    > > 0 ammonia
    > > 8.6 ph
    > > 0 nitrates
    > > 1 percula
    > > 1 lawnmower goby
    > > 1 mandarin
    > > 1 blue damsel
    > > 1 urchin
    > > 1 coral band
    > > 1 peppermint(that I haven't seen in over a week)

    >
    > --
    > Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    > Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    > Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
    >
    >
     
    Kelly, Jan 24, 2004
    #3
  4. Kelly

    Ct Midnite Guest

    I don't think it sand sifting that hurts as much as it is what the
    sand sifters are eating. My cucumbers eat sand all the time but it
    just surface and I've never heard anyone bad mouth the cuc's. Don't
    know about the snails.

    I had two sand sifting stars, one in each of my display tanks. I took
    both back to my lfs for no credit.

    I was amazing the difference between my two display tank's and my
    refugium's sands. They were literally lifeless compared to the
    refugium.

    I didn't believe at first, but now I do.

    Ct Midnite


    On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 06:45:55 GMT, "Kelly" <foo@foo.com> wrote:

    >So the sand sifting snail is bad? I thought I needed him to mix it up.
    >"Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message
    >news:401211F5.2EBC5259@swbell.net...
    >> Hi Kelly,
    >>
    >> It could be a combination of things. Overfeeding, underskimming, excess
    >> phosphates.....
    >>
    >> Your sand sifting starfish is eating the beneficial bacteria and

    >microfauna your
    >> sand bed needs to be a healthy deep sand bed. Plus you've got a mandarin

    >that
    >> eats those same bugs. Once your sand bed is dead / lifeless, you'll have

    >quite
    >> a bit of nuisance algae growing on your substrate and rockwork.
    >>
    >> If you've got a refugium with macro algae connected to your system, it

    >will help
    >> prevent microalgae growth.
    >>
    >> Marc
    >>
    >>
    >> Kelly wrote:
    >>
    >> > I have an outbreak of red hair algae. I just did a 15% water change with

    >RO
    >> > water. Could this be why? Or is it because I only have:
    >> >
    >> > 2 turbo snails
    >> > 1 sandsifter
    >> > 2 hermits
    >> > 1 emerald crab
    >> >
    >> > As my clean up crew?
    >> >
    >> > 30 gallon tank
    >> > 0 ammonia
    >> > 8.6 ph
    >> > 0 nitrates
    >> > 1 percula
    >> > 1 lawnmower goby
    >> > 1 mandarin
    >> > 1 blue damsel
    >> > 1 urchin
    >> > 1 coral band
    >> > 1 peppermint(that I haven't seen in over a week)

    >>
    >> --
    >> Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    >> Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    >> Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
    >>
    >>

    >



    http://www.geocities.com/ctmidnite53/
     
    Ct Midnite, Jan 24, 2004
    #4
  5. A lot of people believe that. I was at the LFS a couple of months ago, and the
    employee had bagged a number of items for a friend of mine. I looked at each
    creature, and then asked who was buying a SSS and a Mandarin at the same time.
    About 2 minutes later my friend walked up and I asked him why he wanted a SSS
    and he thought as you did.

    However, when I pointed out that this was going into a 150g reef tank, the
    employee immediately agreed that it did not belong in a reef tank. Another guy
    in my club turned his entire DSB lifeless with a SSS and had a major algae
    outbreak, and that was on a 120g.

    If you want sand sifting, consider (tigertail) cucumbers, nassarius snails,
    and/or fighting conchs.

    SSS are good for FO tanks, as long as those fish don't eat starfish.

    Marc


    Kelly wrote:

    > So the sand sifting snail is bad? I thought I needed him to mix it up.
    > "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message
    > news:401211F5.2EBC5259@swbell.net...
    > > Hi Kelly,
    > >
    > > It could be a combination of things. Overfeeding, underskimming, excess
    > > phosphates.....
    > >
    > > Your sand sifting starfish is eating the beneficial bacteria and

    > microfauna your
    > > sand bed needs to be a healthy deep sand bed. Plus you've got a mandarin

    > that
    > > eats those same bugs. Once your sand bed is dead / lifeless, you'll have

    > quite
    > > a bit of nuisance algae growing on your substrate and rockwork.
    > >
    > > If you've got a refugium with macro algae connected to your system, it

    > will help
    > > prevent microalgae growth.
    > >
    > > Marc
    > >
    > >
    > > Kelly wrote:
    > >
    > > > I have an outbreak of red hair algae. I just did a 15% water change with

    > RO
    > > > water. Could this be why? Or is it because I only have:
    > > >
    > > > 2 turbo snails
    > > > 1 sandsifter
    > > > 2 hermits
    > > > 1 emerald crab
    > > >
    > > > As my clean up crew?
    > > >
    > > > 30 gallon tank
    > > > 0 ammonia
    > > > 8.6 ph
    > > > 0 nitrates
    > > > 1 percula
    > > > 1 lawnmower goby
    > > > 1 mandarin
    > > > 1 blue damsel
    > > > 1 urchin
    > > > 1 coral band
    > > > 1 peppermint(that I haven't seen in over a week)

    > >
    > > --
    > > Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    > > Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    > > Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
    > >
    > >


    --
    Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
     
    Marc Levenson, Jan 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Kelly

    John Guest

    I have a 100 gallon with a shallow sandbed and employ a SSS to mix up this
    1" bed. IMO it is ok to use a SSS in a shallow sandbed. It only helps to
    turn the bed over.

    John
     
    John, Jan 24, 2004
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.