RO pressure booster pump

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by Pszemol, Nov 2, 2003.

  1. Pszemol

    Pszemol Guest

    Hi there,

    My tap water pressure is around 40PSI, my membrane is 10gpd TFC.
    I have heard the optimum pressure for RO membranes is from 65-120PSI.
    I am considering a purchase of a booster pump but it is quite expensive.

    What are benefits of increased pressure?
    What are risks of increasing it too much?
     
    Pszemol, Nov 2, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. The benefit is faster production, as the RO membrane works better under higher
    pressure. I've been told it will actually extend the life of the membrane as
    well. I would suggest you boost it up to about 80 psi.

    Marc


    Pszemol wrote:

    > Hi there,
    >
    > My tap water pressure is around 40PSI, my membrane is 10gpd TFC.
    > I have heard the optimum pressure for RO membranes is from 65-120PSI.
    > I am considering a purchase of a booster pump but it is quite expensive.
    >
    > What are benefits of increased pressure?
    > What are risks of increasing it too much?


    --
    Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
     
    Marc Levenson, Nov 2, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Pszemol

    Pszemol Guest

    How much should I trust recommendation given by KENT?
    They state optimum pressure for my membrane is 65PSI...
    I am not sure if KENT is manufacturing their own membranes
    or rather markets common membranes made by others?

    Is there a maximum pressure you should never go over it?
    Is is possible to damage membrane with too much pressure?

    Does increased pressure improves quality of the permeate?
    Does is decrease waste to product ratio?
    I have found such statement when searching net...


    "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message news:3FA578AF.EB95A53@swbell.net...
    > The benefit is faster production, as the RO membrane works better under higher
    > pressure. I've been told it will actually extend the life of the membrane as
    > well. I would suggest you boost it up to about 80 psi.
    >
    > Marc
    >
    >
    > Pszemol wrote:
    >
    > > Hi there,
    > >
    > > My tap water pressure is around 40PSI, my membrane is 10gpd TFC.
    > > I have heard the optimum pressure for RO membranes is from 65-120PSI.
    > > I am considering a purchase of a booster pump but it is quite expensive.
    > >
    > > What are benefits of increased pressure?
    > > What are risks of increasing it too much?

    >
    > --
    > Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    > Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    > Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
    >
    >
     
    Pszemol, Nov 2, 2003
    #3
  4. Pszemol

    CapFusion Guest

    [snip]
    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:bo3tv9$2em$1@news.onet.pl...
    > How much should I trust recommendation given by KENT?
    > They state optimum pressure for my membrane is 65PSI...
    > I am not sure if KENT is manufacturing their own membranes
    > or rather markets common membranes made by others?
    >

    [/snip]
    Optimal pressure should be between 60 - 85. 120 is very dangerous level.

    [snip]
    > Is there a maximum pressure you should never go over it?
    > Is is possible to damage membrane with too much pressure?
    >

    [/snip]
    I belived 120 PSI is too high that I read some where. [going by memory].

    [snip]
    > Does increased pressure improves quality of the permeate?
    > Does is decrease waste to product ratio?
    > I have found such statement when searching net...
    >

    [/snip]
    Higher prussure like 80 or so will give efficient operation output and
    performance.

    CapFusion,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 3, 2003
    #4
  5. Pszemol

    Pszemol Guest

    Marc and others: what PSW Tank Pressure Shut Off Switch should I pick?
    I have three options: 40PSI, 60PSI, 80PSI... The store description tells me I need
    to pick the pressure I want my collection tank to be filled with... but... I have no
    collection tank - I need it to fill an empty bucket with a KENT float switch.
    I have already pressure switch on the RO intake to switch tap off when the bucket
    is full - I understand PSW switch is to switch the pump electrically off... Which to pick?

    I am e-mailing the store c-support, but I need first hand users perspective as well :)

    BTW - what version do you guys have? 12V or 24V? Does it matter anyhow ?
    Thanks.

    "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message news:3FA578AF.EB95A53@swbell.net...
    > The benefit is faster production, as the RO membrane works better under higher
    > pressure. I've been told it will actually extend the life of the membrane as
    > well. I would suggest you boost it up to about 80 psi.
    >
    > Marc
    >
    >
    > Pszemol wrote:
    >
    > > Hi there,
    > >
    > > My tap water pressure is around 40PSI, my membrane is 10gpd TFC.
    > > I have heard the optimum pressure for RO membranes is from 65-120PSI.
    > > I am considering a purchase of a booster pump but it is quite expensive.
    > >
    > > What are benefits of increased pressure?
    > > What are risks of increasing it too much?

    >
    > --
    > Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    > Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    > Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
    >
    >
     
    Pszemol, Nov 4, 2003
    #5
  6. Pszemol

    Rod Guest

    >Optimal pressure should be between 60 - 85. 120 is very dangerous level.
    >


    Yes, At least for most of the RO units sold to hobbyists. But there are many RO
    units that require much higher PSI. That last unit I was maintaining required
    225 PSI to run efficiantly. That was a 1700 GPD unit tho ;)
    Rod Buehler
    www.asplashoflife.com
     
    Rod, Nov 4, 2003
    #6
  7. Pszemol

    Raymond Guest

    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message news:<bo3sqc$snv$1@news.onet.pl>...
    > Hi there,
    >
    > My tap water pressure is around 40PSI, my membrane is 10gpd TFC.
    > I have heard the optimum pressure for RO membranes is from 65-120PSI.
    > I am considering a purchase of a booster pump but it is quite expensive.
    >
    > What are benefits of increased pressure?
    > What are risks of increasing it too much?


    About three years (or so) back there was a response from Spectrapure
    on this subject. 100PSI was the ideal for the maximum output without
    dropping the quality of the purified water. 70 PSI is where the
    membranes are tested. The quality of the filtered water, filtered
    water quantity, and membrane life span were the areas improved when
    increasing source water pressure. (the response was to a man that had
    a source water pressure of 40psi) The response from spectrapure didn't
    discuss how much pressure it would take to damage the membrane but I
    wouldn't go above 100PSI. Also along these lines would be a membrane
    flush kit. It is basicly a valve that bypasses the output restricter.
    You simple turn the valve on and let it run for 30 seconds or so about
    once a month. This flushes the membrane off and will extend its life.
    I believe they are available from both Kent and Spectrapure. I don't
    have the original response although I didn't do a search in this
    newgroup....

    Hope this was helpful....
     
    Raymond, Nov 4, 2003
    #7
  8. Pszemol

    CapFusion Guest

    "Rod" <rbuehler9@cs.com> wrote in message
    news:20031104082212.26583.00000036@mb-m05.news.cs.com...
    > >Optimal pressure should be between 60 - 85. 120 is very dangerous level.
    > >

    >
    > Yes, At least for most of the RO units sold to hobbyists. But there are

    many RO
    > units that require much higher PSI. That last unit I was maintaining

    required
    > 225 PSI to run efficiantly. That was a 1700 GPD unit tho ;)
    > Rod Buehler
    > www.asplashoflife.com


    So far as those 225 PSI I have seen are like industry type that require more
    pressure but for those normal hobbyist kind are normally at 60 - 85 PSI.

    CapFusion,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 4, 2003
    #8
  9. Pszemol

    CapFusion Guest

    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:bo6iud.16g.1@poczta.onet.pl...
    > Marc and others: what PSW Tank Pressure Shut Off Switch should I pick?
    > I have three options: 40PSI, 60PSI, 80PSI... The store description tells

    me I need
    > to pick the pressure I want my collection tank to be filled with... but...

    I have no
    > collection tank - I need it to fill an empty bucket with a KENT float

    switch.
    > I have already pressure switch on the RO intake to switch tap off when the

    bucket
    > is full - I understand PSW switch is to switch the pump electrically

    off... Which to pick?
    >
    > I am e-mailing the store c-support, but I need first hand users

    perspective as well :)
    >
    > BTW - what version do you guys have? 12V or 24V? Does it matter anyhow ?
    > Thanks.
    >


    Pszemol, I am not sure I am valid to answer your question regarding which
    PSI to get since I do not have or own one. But I do not see the point of
    having one either (If I unstand your case). Are you talking about a booster
    pump?
    http://www.aquaticreefsystems.com/aquarium_pumps.htm
    If so, you will need to get the pump that fit your need. If you have like 40
    PSi, they get 80PSI booster pump to push your PSI upto 80 PSI. The above
    link is about 70 to 120 PSI booster pump, regardless of your feed water
    pussure.

    Since you already have a float switch, all you need is to attach it to your
    bucket.

    CapFusion,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 4, 2003
    #9
  10. CapFusion wrote:

    > "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    > news:bo6iud.16g.1@poczta.onet.pl...
    > > Marc and others: what PSW Tank Pressure Shut Off Switch should I pick?
    > > I have three options: 40PSI, 60PSI, 80PSI... The store description tells

    > me I need
    > > to pick the pressure I want my collection tank to be filled with... but...

    > I have no
    > > collection tank - I need it to fill an empty bucket with a KENT float

    > switch.
    > > I have already pressure switch on the RO intake to switch tap off when the

    > bucket
    > > is full - I understand PSW switch is to switch the pump electrically

    > off... Which to pick?
    > >
    > > I am e-mailing the store c-support, but I need first hand users

    > perspective as well :)
    > >
    > > BTW - what version do you guys have? 12V or 24V? Does it matter anyhow ?
    > > Thanks.
    > >


    A float valve will not be absolutely trustworthy, because it may continue to
    trickle out a minute amount of water, keeping your unit running all the time at
    a very low rate. If that occurs, your water will actually be more polluted then
    ever because of the super low flow rate.

    If you want to use a float valve, use it as a safety/reminder. Then turn off
    the RO/DI either before or after the unit, until you need to make fresh water.

    Marc


    --
    Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
     
    Marc Levenson, Nov 4, 2003
    #10
  11. Pszemol

    Pszemol Guest

    "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message news:3FA80B6B.4E4287AF@swbell.net...
    > A float valve will not be absolutely trustworthy, because it may continue to
    > trickle out a minute amount of water, keeping your unit running all the time at
    > a very low rate. If that occurs, your water will actually be more polluted then
    > ever because of the super low flow rate.


    What is the theory behind this effect? How is low flow affecting membrane?

    > If you want to use a float valve, use it as a safety/reminder. Then turn off
    > the RO/DI either before or after the unit, until you need to make fresh water.


    Good idea - I will consider it. At first I was going to hook up the float switch
    and have water constantly replenished. I had no idea it is a bad idea :)
     
    Pszemol, Nov 5, 2003
    #11
  12. Pszemol

    Pszemol Guest

    "CapFusion" <CapFusion..@hotmail..com> wrote in message news:vqfmsj538hrfb8@corp.supernews.com...
    > Pszemol, I am not sure I am valid to answer your question regarding which
    > PSI to get since I do not have or own one. But I do not see the point of
    > having one either (If I unstand your case). Are you talking about a booster
    > pump?
    > http://www.aquaticreefsystems.com/aquarium_pumps.htm


    Yes, I am thinking about a booster pump. But since I never had one
    I am not comfortably making this decision... Is is worth it if I have
    40PSI already? Will I have enough returns from this investments
    boosting the pressure to the KENT-recommended 65PSI? Or maybe should
    I override their recommendation and go with the crowd, boosting it to 80PSI?
    Does this pump have precise regulation of the output pressure? How is it done?

    > If so, you will need to get the pump that fit your need. If you have like 40
    > PSi, they get 80PSI booster pump to push your PSI upto 80 PSI. The above
    > link is about 70 to 120 PSI booster pump, regardless of your feed water
    > pussure.


    Thanks, I will look at it.

    > Since you already have a float switch, all you need is to attach it to your
    > bucket.


    I have read they use other kind of switch to actualy turn off the pump
    electricaly when the desired pressure is achieved. My float switch is
    just shutting off the water exchaust and then, with back pressure, the
    water intake. But the booster pump will operate constatly, even when
    not needed. I have days, weeks sometimes without need to produce RO water.
    How should I turn off my pump during inactivity periods?
     
    Pszemol, Nov 5, 2003
    #12
  13. Pszemol

    Pszemol Guest

    Yes Raymond, thank you - I will google for this old thread.

    "Raymond" <rdsmith@intcon.net> wrote in message news:e519c6f1.0311040727.3d750a86@posting.google.com...
    > About three years (or so) back there was a response from Spectrapure
    > on this subject. 100PSI was the ideal for the maximum output without
    > dropping the quality of the purified water. 70 PSI is where the
    > membranes are tested. The quality of the filtered water, filtered
    > water quantity, and membrane life span were the areas improved when
    > increasing source water pressure. (the response was to a man that had
    > a source water pressure of 40psi) The response from spectrapure didn't
    > discuss how much pressure it would take to damage the membrane but I
    > wouldn't go above 100PSI. Also along these lines would be a membrane
    > flush kit. It is basicly a valve that bypasses the output restricter.
    > You simple turn the valve on and let it run for 30 seconds or so about
    > once a month. This flushes the membrane off and will extend its life.
    > I believe they are available from both Kent and Spectrapure. I don't
    > have the original response although I didn't do a search in this
    > newgroup....
    >
    > Hope this was helpful....
     
    Pszemol, Nov 5, 2003
    #13
  14. I had a long conversation with a guy in the RO/DI business about this very subject, and
    basically if your water is tricking in a tiny bit at a time (rather than 4gph), your
    membrane is not able to keep the crap out of the water output. The flow is simply so
    incredibly slow that it is able to travel right into your pure water.

    So the very thing you hope to keep out of your system can/will trickle in extremely slowly
    24 hours a day. Because your tank always evaporate a little bit of water, the float valve
    never has quite enough water pushing it up to keep it closed, and your system will run
    non-stop. And when that occurs, your waste line will be running non-stop as well. So
    you'll be wasting water as well.

    I didn't take notes ;) but what I was hearing made a lot of sense to me and confirmed my own
    suspicions at that point. I always make 5 to 10g at a time, and turn off the system by
    closing a valve on the (good) output.

    Marc

    Pszemol wrote:

    > "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message news:3FA80B6B.4E4287AF@swbell.net...
    > > A float valve will not be absolutely trustworthy, because it may continue to
    > > trickle out a minute amount of water, keeping your unit running all the time at
    > > a very low rate. If that occurs, your water will actually be more polluted then
    > > ever because of the super low flow rate.

    >
    > What is the theory behind this effect? How is low flow affecting membrane?
    >
    > > If you want to use a float valve, use it as a safety/reminder. Then turn off
    > > the RO/DI either before or after the unit, until you need to make fresh water.

    >
    > Good idea - I will consider it. At first I was going to hook up the float switch
    > and have water constantly replenished. I had no idea it is a bad idea :)


    --
    Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
     
    Marc Levenson, Nov 5, 2003
    #14
  15. Pszemol

    Pszemol Guest

    But what you do defeats the purpose of havin automatic top-off system...
    Is there another way to do the same job without human/manual operations?

    "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message news:3FA8781E.C9AFF81E@swbell.net...
    > I had a long conversation with a guy in the RO/DI business about this very subject, and
    > basically if your water is tricking in a tiny bit at a time (rather than 4gph), your
    > membrane is not able to keep the crap out of the water output. The flow is simply so
    > incredibly slow that it is able to travel right into your pure water.
    >
    > So the very thing you hope to keep out of your system can/will trickle in extremely slowly
    > 24 hours a day. Because your tank always evaporate a little bit of water, the float valve
    > never has quite enough water pushing it up to keep it closed, and your system will run
    > non-stop. And when that occurs, your waste line will be running non-stop as well. So
    > you'll be wasting water as well.
    >
    > I didn't take notes ;) but what I was hearing made a lot of sense to me and confirmed my own
    > suspicions at that point. I always make 5 to 10g at a time, and turn off the system by
    > closing a valve on the (good) output.
     
    Pszemol, Nov 5, 2003
    #15
  16. Pszemol

    Raymond Guest

    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message news:<bo91mh.3v4.1@poczta.onet.pl>...
    > I have read they use other kind of switch to actualy turn off the pump
    > electricaly when the desired pressure is achieved. My float switch is
    > just shutting off the water exchaust and then, with back pressure, the
    > water intake. But the booster pump will operate constatly, even when
    > not needed. I have days, weeks sometimes without need to produce RO water.
    > How should I turn off my pump during inactivity periods?


    I think the difference you are looking for is a pressure switch versus
    a pressure valve. Most RO systems use a pressure valve to turn off the
    source water when the filtered water output line reaches a given
    pressure. This works great for the drinking water kits and float valve
    top off systems but it doesn't allow for turning power on/off to the
    booster pump. You need to add a pressure *switch* that will turn the
    power off to the booster pump when the desired pressure is reached....
     
    Raymond, Nov 5, 2003
    #16
  17. Pszemol

    Chimera Guest

    Whoa.
    From what I know about RO, a semi-permeable membrane is used to reject
    molecules (?) larger than H20.
    How would low pressure defeat the membrane? Must be the design of the
    unit(does the source water get around the membrane?) , not the
    physics.


    Marc Levenson <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message news:<3FA8781E.C9AFF81E@swbell.net>...
    > I had a long conversation with a guy in the RO/DI business about this very subject, and
    > basically if your water is tricking in a tiny bit at a time (rather than 4gph), your
    > membrane is not able to keep the crap out of the water output. The flow is simply so
    > incredibly slow that it is able to travel right into your pure water.
    >
    > So the very thing you hope to keep out of your system can/will trickle in extremely slowly
    > 24 hours a day. Because your tank always evaporate a little bit of water, the float valve
    > never has quite enough water pushing it up to keep it closed, and your system will run
    > non-stop. And when that occurs, your waste line will be running non-stop as well. So
    > you'll be wasting water as well.
    >
    > I didn't take notes ;) but what I was hearing made a lot of sense to me and confirmed my own
    > suspicions at that point. I always make 5 to 10g at a time, and turn off the system by
    > closing a valve on the (good) output.
    >
    > Marc
    >
    > Pszemol wrote:
    >
    > > "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message news:3FA80B6B.4E4287AF@swbell.net...
    > > > A float valve will not be absolutely trustworthy, because it may continue to
    > > > trickle out a minute amount of water, keeping your unit running all the time at
    > > > a very low rate. If that occurs, your water will actually be more polluted then
    > > > ever because of the super low flow rate.

    > >
    > > What is the theory behind this effect? How is low flow affecting membrane?
    > >
    > > > If you want to use a float valve, use it as a safety/reminder. Then turn off
    > > > the RO/DI either before or after the unit, until you need to make fresh water.

    > >
    > > Good idea - I will consider it. At first I was going to hook up the float switch
    > > and have water constantly replenished. I had no idea it is a bad idea :)
     
    Chimera, Nov 5, 2003
    #17
  18. Pszemol

    CapFusion Guest

    [snip]
    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:bo91e0.3h0.1@poczta.onet.pl...
    > "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message

    news:3FA80B6B.4E4287AF@swbell.net...
    > > A float valve will not be absolutely trustworthy, because it may

    continue to
    > > trickle out a minute amount of water, keeping your unit running all the

    time at
    > > a very low rate. If that occurs, your water will actually be more

    polluted then
    > > ever because of the super low flow rate.

    >
    > What is the theory behind this effect? How is low flow affecting membrane?
    >

    [/snip]
    Any water pressure over 35 to 40 P.S.I. should be sufficient to run in
    reverse osmosis unit correctly. Keep in mind however that the more pressure
    the easier the water will have penetrating the membrane element itself.
    Running a system with too little pressure will cause underproduction and
    over waste.


    [snip]
    > > If you want to use a float valve, use it as a safety/reminder. Then

    turn off
    > > the RO/DI either before or after the unit, until you need to make fresh

    water.
    >
    > Good idea - I will consider it. At first I was going to hook up the float

    switch
    > and have water constantly replenished. I had no idea it is a bad idea :)

    [/snip]
    I prefer not to have float switch in any part of any system but anyone need
    to have it then be caution if using with endless supply of water. But if it
    setup coming from a resoviour or a bladder without endless source then it is
    GOOD.

    CapFusion,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 5, 2003
    #18
  19. Pszemol

    CapFusion Guest

    [snip]
    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:bo91mh.3v4.1@poczta.onet.pl...
    > "CapFusion" <CapFusion..@hotmail..com> wrote in message

    news:vqfmsj538hrfb8@corp.supernews.com...
    > > Pszemol, I am not sure I am valid to answer your question regarding

    which
    > > PSI to get since I do not have or own one. But I do not see the point of
    > > having one either (If I unstand your case). Are you talking about a

    booster
    > > pump?
    > > http://www.aquaticreefsystems.com/aquarium_pumps.htm

    >
    > Yes, I am thinking about a booster pump. But since I never had one
    > I am not comfortably making this decision... Is is worth it if I have
    > 40PSI already? Will I have enough returns from this investments
    > boosting the pressure to the KENT-recommended 65PSI? Or maybe should
    > I override their recommendation and go with the crowd, boosting it to

    80PSI?
    > Does this pump have precise regulation of the output pressure? How is it

    done?
    >

    [/snip]
    The one I saw like 550 series, it can run intermittently / demand by
    presssure / delivery mode by a switch.

    Regarding "precise regulation", I am not to sure if it "precise" as to
    speaking but you can ask ARS [John] for detail information. Having your
    feed or pressure about 80PSI is good for your RO to produce pure water. At
    80 PSI, it can penatrate the membrane for better efficient output and will
    produce less waste. Getting about 40 PSI will be less efficient and produce
    more waste water. Optimal recommend is about 80 PSI or so.

    [snip]
    > I have read they use other kind of switch to actualy turn off the pump
    > electricaly when the desired pressure is achieved. My float switch is
    > just shutting off the water exchaust and then, with back pressure, the
    > water intake. But the booster pump will operate constatly, even when
    > not needed. I have days, weeks sometimes without need to produce RO water.
    > How should I turn off my pump during inactivity periods?

    [/snip]
    I guess the 550 series pump does the same as the one you are referring to?

    CapFusion,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 5, 2003
    #19
  20. Pszemol

    CapFusion Guest

    IMHO, I prefer not to have any auto top-off or auto switch that feed either
    the sump or the tank with the water level get low. I have 100G tank 40G sump
    that will evaporate abut 5 - 10G a week or so. When it evaporate, I just use
    from a resovour or from a water dispenser. No big deal as for manul work.
    But it a big deal if the auto-shut off switch / valve fail to turn off the
    water, it will cause overflow both to the sump and the tank. I may need to
    call Marc for his "Sparkling Floor Service" to clean up my floor / carpet.
    The only auto is the Auto-Valve from the RO. You do not want to know that
    your floor got flooded when you get home from work / school or whatever. It
    will become another expense to fix.

    CapFusion,...


    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:boaf3l.5qo.0@poczta.onet.pl...
    > But what you do defeats the purpose of havin automatic top-off system...
    > Is there another way to do the same job without human/manual operations?
    >
    > "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message

    news:3FA8781E.C9AFF81E@swbell.net...
    > > I had a long conversation with a guy in the RO/DI business about this

    very subject, and
    > > basically if your water is tricking in a tiny bit at a time (rather than

    4gph), your
    > > membrane is not able to keep the crap out of the water output. The flow

    is simply so
    > > incredibly slow that it is able to travel right into your pure water.
    > >
    > > So the very thing you hope to keep out of your system can/will trickle

    in extremely slowly
    > > 24 hours a day. Because your tank always evaporate a little bit of

    water, the float valve
    > > never has quite enough water pushing it up to keep it closed, and your

    system will run
    > > non-stop. And when that occurs, your waste line will be running

    non-stop as well. So
    > > you'll be wasting water as well.
    > >
    > > I didn't take notes ;) but what I was hearing made a lot of sense to me

    and confirmed my own
    > > suspicions at that point. I always make 5 to 10g at a time, and turn

    off the system by
    > > closing a valve on the (good) output.

    >
     
    CapFusion, Nov 5, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.