RO recycle of waste water

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by Mark Breithaupt, Nov 3, 2003.

  1. We bought the RO unit. 3 stage, 10GPD.
    We get about 5 gal. of waste for every 1.3 gal. of purified water.
    Any suggestions for using the excess water?
    I know that if certain chemical levels are above the limits of the RO unit
    performance you get lower purity.
    We're pondering the idea of recycling the waste water back through with a
    pump to maximize our water usage (Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)
    Testing the water to see if it has higher levels than the unit can handle
    would be the next most logical option.
    Anyone tried to do anything useful with their waste water?


    Thanx

    Mark and A
     
    Mark Breithaupt, Nov 3, 2003
    #1
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  2. Mark Breithaupt

    CapFusion Guest

    Yes, use it for your plant or your lawn. It should have high phosphate and
    other nutrient.

    When you indicate "(Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)", I assume
    they count water intake to your resident but not the output to your
    drainage.

    CapFusion,...


    "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:RNednTrOifNldDuiRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    > We bought the RO unit. 3 stage, 10GPD.
    > We get about 5 gal. of waste for every 1.3 gal. of purified water.
    > Any suggestions for using the excess water?
    > I know that if certain chemical levels are above the limits of the RO unit
    > performance you get lower purity.
    > We're pondering the idea of recycling the waste water back through with a
    > pump to maximize our water usage (Our sewage bill reflects our water

    usage.)
    > Testing the water to see if it has higher levels than the unit can handle
    > would be the next most logical option.
    > Anyone tried to do anything useful with their waste water?
    >
    >
    > Thanx
    >
    > Mark and A
    >
    >
     
    CapFusion, Nov 4, 2003
    #2
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  3. Good advice. Thanks. Yes, the sewer bill is based on our water usage.
    Our juices are flowing now for RO waste water usage.
    We think we can find a way to use the waste water in our furnace
    humidifier.
    The humidifier uses about 10 -15 gallons/day. (We may suffer from mineral
    deposits in the humidifier, but that's manageable).
    The RO is about 15 feet from the humidifier. We have figured 50 -75
    gallons/month for evaporation and water changes for our 55 gallon tank,
    producing about 250 -300 gallons/month of waste, which can be routed to the
    humidifier.
    A good sized storage tank and a light duty pump can keep a continuous flow
    to the humidifier. The humidifier is a disc type and uses a float valve to
    keep the reservoir full. An overflow in the storage tank to a drain for
    waste water that gets ahead of the humidifier's consumption. An additional
    feeder line connected to a float valve near the bottom of the waste water
    storage container, connected to the pre RO water supply, will keep the waste
    water tank (and humidifier) from running dry. In the spring, we'll run new
    pipe and divert the water feeding the humidifier to a tap on our deck where
    we keep our plants.Voila!
    Then of course we would need to install a wet bar on the deck to use any
    MORE excess water not used for plants LOL. And then maybe a small pond with
    a fountain....and some goldfish!.....

    Mark and A


    "CapFusion" <CapFusion..@hotmail..com> wrote in message
    news:vqdsm24h4rhe81@corp.supernews.com...
    > Yes, use it for your plant or your lawn. It should have high phosphate and
    > other nutrient.
    >
    > When you indicate "(Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)", I assume
    > they count water intake to your resident but not the output to your
    > drainage.
    >
    > CapFusion,...
    >
    >
    > "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > news:RNednTrOifNldDuiRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    > > We bought the RO unit. 3 stage, 10GPD.
    > > We get about 5 gal. of waste for every 1.3 gal. of purified water.
    > > Any suggestions for using the excess water?
    > > I know that if certain chemical levels are above the limits of the RO

    unit
    > > performance you get lower purity.
    > > We're pondering the idea of recycling the waste water back through with

    a
    > > pump to maximize our water usage (Our sewage bill reflects our water

    > usage.)
    > > Testing the water to see if it has higher levels than the unit can

    handle
    > > would be the next most logical option.
    > > Anyone tried to do anything useful with their waste water?
    > >
    > >
    > > Thanx
    > >
    > > Mark and A
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Mark Breithaupt, Nov 5, 2003
    #3
  4. Mark Breithaupt

    Pszemol Guest

    If you have to go through so many hops to avoid water wasting with RO,
    why have you bought it first place? Why not go with deionizators alone,
    they do not waste water like RO membranes...
    Check out KENT DEION 200 units, all info you will find on their website
    www.kentmarine.com Or other "no waste water" solutions, like this one:
    http://www.championlighting.com/e/env/0001isiGRChfa9c69E9v3A6/Products/Reverse_Osmosis/kold.html

    Good luck.

    "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message news:pvudnQKvktZj1DWiRVn-vA@comcast.com...
    > Good advice. Thanks. Yes, the sewer bill is based on our water usage.
    > Our juices are flowing now for RO waste water usage.
    > We think we can find a way to use the waste water in our furnace
    > humidifier.
    > The humidifier uses about 10 -15 gallons/day. (We may suffer from mineral
    > deposits in the humidifier, but that's manageable).
    > The RO is about 15 feet from the humidifier. We have figured 50 -75
    > gallons/month for evaporation and water changes for our 55 gallon tank,
    > producing about 250 -300 gallons/month of waste, which can be routed to the
    > humidifier.
    > A good sized storage tank and a light duty pump can keep a continuous flow
    > to the humidifier. The humidifier is a disc type and uses a float valve to
    > keep the reservoir full. An overflow in the storage tank to a drain for
    > waste water that gets ahead of the humidifier's consumption. An additional
    > feeder line connected to a float valve near the bottom of the waste water
    > storage container, connected to the pre RO water supply, will keep the waste
    > water tank (and humidifier) from running dry. In the spring, we'll run new
    > pipe and divert the water feeding the humidifier to a tap on our deck where
    > we keep our plants.Voila!
    > Then of course we would need to install a wet bar on the deck to use any
    > MORE excess water not used for plants LOL. And then maybe a small pond with
    > a fountain....and some goldfish!.....
    >
    > Mark and A
    >
    >
    > "CapFusion" <CapFusion..@hotmail..com> wrote in message
    > news:vqdsm24h4rhe81@corp.supernews.com...
    > > Yes, use it for your plant or your lawn. It should have high phosphate and
    > > other nutrient.
    > >
    > > When you indicate "(Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)", I assume
    > > they count water intake to your resident but not the output to your
    > > drainage.
    > >
    > > CapFusion,...
    > >
    > >
    > > "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > > news:RNednTrOifNldDuiRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    > > > We bought the RO unit. 3 stage, 10GPD.
    > > > We get about 5 gal. of waste for every 1.3 gal. of purified water.
    > > > Any suggestions for using the excess water?
    > > > I know that if certain chemical levels are above the limits of the RO

    > unit
    > > > performance you get lower purity.
    > > > We're pondering the idea of recycling the waste water back through with

    > a
    > > > pump to maximize our water usage (Our sewage bill reflects our water

    > > usage.)
    > > > Testing the water to see if it has higher levels than the unit can

    > handle
    > > > would be the next most logical option.
    > > > Anyone tried to do anything useful with their waste water?
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > Thanx
    > > >
    > > > Mark and A
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Pszemol, Nov 5, 2003
    #4
  5. Mark Breithaupt

    Tom Burns Guest

    CapFusion wrote:
    > Yes, use it for your plant or your lawn. It should have high phosphate and
    > other nutrient.
    >
    > When you indicate "(Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)", I assume
    > they count water intake to your resident but not the output to your
    > drainage.
    >
    > CapFusion,...


    Some utilities use both. They charge you for water based on how much you
    draw, then charge a "discharge" fee based on some calculation of how
    much is not consumed (ie drank, used to water gardens, fill a pool,
    etc.)and therefore returned to the sewer. I think it is a percentage.
     
    Tom Burns, Nov 5, 2003
    #5
  6. Mark Breithaupt

    CapFusion Guest

    "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:pvudnQKvktZj1DWiRVn-vA@comcast.com...
    > Good advice. Thanks. Yes, the sewer bill is based on our water usage.
    > Our juices are flowing now for RO waste water usage.
    > We think we can find a way to use the waste water in our furnace
    > humidifier.
    > The humidifier uses about 10 -15 gallons/day. (We may suffer from mineral
    > deposits in the humidifier, but that's manageable).
    > The RO is about 15 feet from the humidifier. We have figured 50 -75
    > gallons/month for evaporation and water changes for our 55 gallon tank,
    > producing about 250 -300 gallons/month of waste, which can be routed to

    the
    > humidifier.
    > A good sized storage tank and a light duty pump can keep a continuous flow
    > to the humidifier. The humidifier is a disc type and uses a float valve to
    > keep the reservoir full. An overflow in the storage tank to a drain for
    > waste water that gets ahead of the humidifier's consumption. An additional
    > feeder line connected to a float valve near the bottom of the waste water
    > storage container, connected to the pre RO water supply, will keep the

    waste
    > water tank (and humidifier) from running dry. In the spring, we'll run

    new
    > pipe and divert the water feeding the humidifier to a tap on our deck

    where
    > we keep our plants.Voila!
    > Then of course we would need to install a wet bar on the deck to use any
    > MORE excess water not used for plants LOL. And then maybe a small pond

    with
    > a fountain....and some goldfish!.....
    >
    > Mark and A


    Wow, very complicated setup you have there but wow.....

    CapFusion,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 5, 2003
    #6
  7. Mark Breithaupt

    CapFusion Guest

    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:boaisp.21k.0@poczta.onet.pl...
    > If you have to go through so many hops to avoid water wasting with RO,
    > why have you bought it first place? Why not go with deionizators alone,
    > they do not waste water like RO membranes...
    > Check out KENT DEION 200 units, all info you will find on their website
    > www.kentmarine.com Or other "no waste water" solutions, like this one:
    >

    http://www.championlighting.com/e/env/0001isiGRChfa9c69E9v3A6/Products/Rever
    se_Osmosis/kold.html


    Ahh...

    I am not too sure if I will go into this debate. You can use just a DI only
    but will cost more due to extra duty it need to reduce / purify your water.
    Your DI will get exhasted quicker and will need to change or recharge it.

    It the same apply to Brita or PUR and other. You will need to change it
    cartridge quicker or more ofthen when compare to RO. So people prefer Brita
    / Pur or RO[DI]? Both do the same job at the end result but the cost is
    different. Gal for gal, RO[DI] will make more when compare to the other.

    When compare to waste water, then RO may waste more. But you can add Auto
    Flush which will reduce waste water and extend the membrance, carbon block
    and prefilter. At the end, it still will waste some water.

    CapFuison,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 5, 2003
    #7
  8. RO produces better water IMO. I don't really want a wet bar or a goldfish
    pond. I was being funny.
    Routing water to my humidifier is a more conservative an cost efficient
    approach than sending it down the river. And you can Blowme.


    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:boaisp.21k.0@poczta.onet.pl...
    > If you have to go through so many hops to avoid water wasting with RO,
    > why have you bought it first place? Why not go with deionizators alone,
    > they do not waste water like RO membranes...
    > Check out KENT DEION 200 units, all info you will find on their website
    > www.kentmarine.com Or other "no waste water" solutions, like this one:
    >

    http://www.championlighting.com/e/env/0001isiGRChfa9c69E9v3A6/Products/Reverse_Osmosis/kold.html
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message

    news:pvudnQKvktZj1DWiRVn-vA@comcast.com...
    > > Good advice. Thanks. Yes, the sewer bill is based on our water usage.
    > > Our juices are flowing now for RO waste water usage.
    > > We think we can find a way to use the waste water in our furnace
    > > humidifier.
    > > The humidifier uses about 10 -15 gallons/day. (We may suffer from

    mineral
    > > deposits in the humidifier, but that's manageable).
    > > The RO is about 15 feet from the humidifier. We have figured 50 -75
    > > gallons/month for evaporation and water changes for our 55 gallon tank,
    > > producing about 250 -300 gallons/month of waste, which can be routed to

    the
    > > humidifier.
    > > A good sized storage tank and a light duty pump can keep a continuous

    flow
    > > to the humidifier. The humidifier is a disc type and uses a float valve

    to
    > > keep the reservoir full. An overflow in the storage tank to a drain for
    > > waste water that gets ahead of the humidifier's consumption. An

    additional
    > > feeder line connected to a float valve near the bottom of the waste

    water
    > > storage container, connected to the pre RO water supply, will keep the

    waste
    > > water tank (and humidifier) from running dry. In the spring, we'll run

    new
    > > pipe and divert the water feeding the humidifier to a tap on our deck

    where
    > > we keep our plants.Voila!
    > > Then of course we would need to install a wet bar on the deck to use any
    > > MORE excess water not used for plants LOL. And then maybe a small pond

    with
    > > a fountain....and some goldfish!.....
    > >
    > > Mark and A
    > >
    > >
    > > "CapFusion" <CapFusion..@hotmail..com> wrote in message
    > > news:vqdsm24h4rhe81@corp.supernews.com...
    > > > Yes, use it for your plant or your lawn. It should have high phosphate

    and
    > > > other nutrient.
    > > >
    > > > When you indicate "(Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)", I

    assume
    > > > they count water intake to your resident but not the output to your
    > > > drainage.
    > > >
    > > > CapFusion,...
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > > > news:RNednTrOifNldDuiRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    > > > > We bought the RO unit. 3 stage, 10GPD.
    > > > > We get about 5 gal. of waste for every 1.3 gal. of purified water.
    > > > > Any suggestions for using the excess water?
    > > > > I know that if certain chemical levels are above the limits of the

    RO
    > > unit
    > > > > performance you get lower purity.
    > > > > We're pondering the idea of recycling the waste water back through

    with
    > > a
    > > > > pump to maximize our water usage (Our sewage bill reflects our water
    > > > usage.)
    > > > > Testing the water to see if it has higher levels than the unit can

    > > handle
    > > > > would be the next most logical option.
    > > > > Anyone tried to do anything useful with their waste water?
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanx
    > > > >
    > > > > Mark and A
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >
     
    Mark Breithaupt, Nov 5, 2003
    #8
  9. RO produces better water IMO. I don't really want a wet bar or a goldfish
    pond. I was being funny.
    Routing water to my humidifier is a more conservative an cost efficient
    approach than sending it down the river. And you can Blowme.


    "Pszemol" <Pszemol@PolBox.com> wrote in message
    news:boaisp.21k.0@poczta.onet.pl...
    > If you have to go through so many hops to avoid water wasting with RO,
    > why have you bought it first place? Why not go with deionizators alone,
    > they do not waste water like RO membranes...
    > Check out KENT DEION 200 units, all info you will find on their website
    > www.kentmarine.com Or other "no waste water" solutions, like this one:
    >

    http://www.championlighting.com/e/env/0001isiGRChfa9c69E9v3A6/Products/Reverse_Osmosis/kold.html
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message

    news:pvudnQKvktZj1DWiRVn-vA@comcast.com...
    > > Good advice. Thanks. Yes, the sewer bill is based on our water usage.
    > > Our juices are flowing now for RO waste water usage.
    > > We think we can find a way to use the waste water in our furnace
    > > humidifier.
    > > The humidifier uses about 10 -15 gallons/day. (We may suffer from

    mineral
    > > deposits in the humidifier, but that's manageable).
    > > The RO is about 15 feet from the humidifier. We have figured 50 -75
    > > gallons/month for evaporation and water changes for our 55 gallon tank,
    > > producing about 250 -300 gallons/month of waste, which can be routed to

    the
    > > humidifier.
    > > A good sized storage tank and a light duty pump can keep a continuous

    flow
    > > to the humidifier. The humidifier is a disc type and uses a float valve

    to
    > > keep the reservoir full. An overflow in the storage tank to a drain for
    > > waste water that gets ahead of the humidifier's consumption. An

    additional
    > > feeder line connected to a float valve near the bottom of the waste

    water
    > > storage container, connected to the pre RO water supply, will keep the

    waste
    > > water tank (and humidifier) from running dry. In the spring, we'll run

    new
    > > pipe and divert the water feeding the humidifier to a tap on our deck

    where
    > > we keep our plants.Voila!
    > > Then of course we would need to install a wet bar on the deck to use any
    > > MORE excess water not used for plants LOL. And then maybe a small pond

    with
    > > a fountain....and some goldfish!.....
    > >
    > > Mark and A
    > >
    > >
    > > "CapFusion" <CapFusion..@hotmail..com> wrote in message
    > > news:vqdsm24h4rhe81@corp.supernews.com...
    > > > Yes, use it for your plant or your lawn. It should have high phosphate

    and
    > > > other nutrient.
    > > >
    > > > When you indicate "(Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)", I

    assume
    > > > they count water intake to your resident but not the output to your
    > > > drainage.
    > > >
    > > > CapFusion,...
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > "Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    > > > news:RNednTrOifNldDuiRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    > > > > We bought the RO unit. 3 stage, 10GPD.
    > > > > We get about 5 gal. of waste for every 1.3 gal. of purified water.
    > > > > Any suggestions for using the excess water?
    > > > > I know that if certain chemical levels are above the limits of the

    RO
    > > unit
    > > > > performance you get lower purity.
    > > > > We're pondering the idea of recycling the waste water back through

    with
    > > a
    > > > > pump to maximize our water usage (Our sewage bill reflects our water
    > > > usage.)
    > > > > Testing the water to see if it has higher levels than the unit can

    > > handle
    > > > > would be the next most logical option.
    > > > > Anyone tried to do anything useful with their waste water?
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Thanx
    > > > >
    > > > > Mark and A
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >
     
    Mark Breithaupt, Nov 5, 2003
    #9
  10. Mark Breithaupt

    CapFusion Guest

    "Tom Burns" <tburnz874@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:9Ibqb.48019$Ol.1292831@read1.cgocable.net...
    > CapFusion wrote:
    > > Yes, use it for your plant or your lawn. It should have high phosphate

    and
    > > other nutrient.
    > >
    > > When you indicate "(Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)", I

    assume
    > > they count water intake to your resident but not the output to your
    > > drainage.
    > >
    > > CapFusion,...

    >
    > Some utilities use both. They charge you for water based on how much you
    > draw, then charge a "discharge" fee based on some calculation of how
    > much is not consumed (ie drank, used to water gardens, fill a pool,
    > etc.)and therefore returned to the sewer. I think it is a percentage.
    >


    I sure hate to live in those area if I need to watch my input and output
    water. Guess I and many other people taking water source as for granted.

    CapFusion,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 6, 2003
    #10
  11. Don't use Brita, it releases silver into the water. That is what makes the
    water taste good. <rolling eyes>

    Marc


    CapFusion wrote:

    > It the same apply to Brita or PUR and other. You will need to change it
    > cartridge quicker or more ofthen when compare to RO. So people prefer Brita
    > / Pur or RO[DI]? Both do the same job at the end result but the cost is
    > different. Gal for gal, RO[DI] will make more when compare to the other.
    >


    --
    Personal Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com/oanda/index.html
    Business Page: http://www.sparklingfloorservice.com
    Marine Hobbyist: http://www.melevsreef.com
     
    Marc Levenson, Nov 6, 2003
    #11
  12. Mark Breithaupt

    CapFusion Guest

    "Marc Levenson" <melev@swbell.net> wrote in message
    news:3FAA3F85.378EA763@swbell.net...
    > Don't use Brita, it releases silver into the water. That is what makes

    the
    > water taste good. <rolling eyes>
    >
    > Marc



    Did your "rolling eyes" catch any silver go thru the cartridge? Heehe....
    J/K.... Yes, I heard some rumor about that too but not too certain.

    CapFusion,...
     
    CapFusion, Nov 6, 2003
    #12
  13. Mark Breithaupt

    Tom Burns Guest


    > I sure hate to live in those area if I need to watch my input and output
    > water. Guess I and many other people taking water source as for granted.
    >
    > CapFusion,...
    >
    >


    It's not that bad. I suspect that the total cost is close to that of
    just a straight consumption charge. And we'd all be better off if no one
    took clean water for granted, so I don't mind paying for what I use and
    for cleaning what I pollute. And, it makes you more cognizant of your
    consumption habits.
     
    Tom Burns, Nov 7, 2003
    #13
  14. Marc Levenson, Nov 7, 2003
    #14
  15. You can "recycle" some part of the output from your RO back
    into the input. RO membranes work by having the water sluce
    across them. Flow rate is the #1 parameter. Oh, #2
    parameter is the quality of the input water. If you feed
    back, the input water will be 20%, or so, more contaminated.
    This may, or may not, matter depending on how dirty the
    water is to begin with.

    But, to do this you'd need a pump. You have to keep low
    pressure on the waste and feed that waste back into the line
    feed pressure. Then you could use a smaller flow limiter
    than rated for your membrane. You still have waste, must
    have waste, no matter what. IMHO, waste the water, it
    cheaper, you get better water, you clog your membrane less soon.

    Your humidifier idea is ok, but a tank and pump idea isn't
    so well considered. Wasting gallons of Water is FAR cheaper
    than electricity to run the pump, and FAR FAR, and even
    FARTHER, more "green". But, you SHOULD plumb the RO waste
    to just dump into the humidifier's reservoir and let it just
    drain through the overflow whatever water is there
    (brackish) down the drain. Healthier for the humidifier,
    but maybe forget the pump.

    ***************************
    Mark Breithaupt wrote:


    The humidifier is a disc type and uses a float valve to
    > keep the reservoir full. An overflow in the storage tank to a drain for
    > waste water that gets ahead of the humidifier's consumption. An additional
    > feeder line connected to a float valve near the bottom of the waste water
    > storage container, connected to the pre RO water supply, will keep the waste
    > water tank (and humidifier) from running dry. In the spring, we'll run new
    > pipe and divert the water feeding the humidifier to a tap on our deck where
    > we keep our plants.Voila!
    > Then of course we would need to install a wet bar on the deck to use any
    > MORE excess water not used for plants LOL. And then maybe a small pond with
    > a fountain....and some goldfish!.....
    >
    > Mark and A
    >
    >
    > "CapFusion" <CapFusion..@hotmail..com> wrote in message
    > news:vqdsm24h4rhe81@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    >>Yes, use it for your plant or your lawn. It should have high phosphate and
    >>other nutrient.
    >>
    >>When you indicate "(Our sewage bill reflects our water usage.)", I assume
    >>they count water intake to your resident but not the output to your
    >>drainage.
    >>
    >>CapFusion,...
    >>
    >>
    >>"Mark Breithaupt" <mapzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >>news:RNednTrOifNldDuiRVn-ig@comcast.com...
    >>
    >>>We bought the RO unit. 3 stage, 10GPD.
    >>>We get about 5 gal. of waste for every 1.3 gal. of purified water.
    >>>Any suggestions for using the excess water?
    >>>I know that if certain chemical levels are above the limits of the RO

    >
    > unit
    >
    >>>performance you get lower purity.
    >>>We're pondering the idea of recycling the waste water back through with

    >
    > a
    >
    >>>pump to maximize our water usage (Our sewage bill reflects our water

    >>
    >>usage.)
    >>
    >>>Testing the water to see if it has higher levels than the unit can

    >
    > handle
    >
    >>>would be the next most logical option.
    >>>Anyone tried to do anything useful with their waste water?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Thanx
    >>>
    >>>Mark and A
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
    Bill Kirkpatrick, Feb 5, 2004
    #15
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