Seahorses in a reef tank

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by Rambo, Dec 11, 2003.

  1. Rambo

    Rambo Guest

    Would seahorses be compatible with a reef tank?
     
    Rambo, Dec 11, 2003
    #1
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  2. Rambo

    Toni Guest

    "Rambo" <rambo@scientist(nospam).com> wrote in message
    news:gu3htvk4si6nnrf8rcc00huc0mfmndjfu3@4ax.com...
    > Would seahorses be compatible with a reef tank?




    Nope.
    Seahorses enjoy calm water while a reef tank needs serious circulation.
    Also I believe many of the reef inhabitants would chomp/sting the horses.
    Probably other reasons as well- temps??

    Seahorses need a dedicated aquarium IMO.


    --
    Toni
    http://www.cearbhaill.com/reef.htm
     
    Toni, Dec 11, 2003
    #2
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  3. Rambo

    John B Guest

    They are reef compatable -- BUT most seahorses like low current environments
    conflicting with reef inhabitants liking strong currents..

    I'm checking out www.seahorse.org to see what else I can find.

    As for compatibility with other fish, seahorses are likely to get "spooked"
    so to say by the other fish. Most fish will leave the horses alone, but the
    horse doesn't know this and gets frightened, of course leading to stress, so
    on and so forth.

    But anyways, have a look at www.seahorse.org I've been here for about an
    hour now. Great site!

    hth
    John

    "Rambo" <rambo@scientist(nospam).com> wrote in message
    news:gu3htvk4si6nnrf8rcc00huc0mfmndjfu3@4ax.com...
    > Would seahorses be compatible with a reef tank?
     
    John B, Dec 11, 2003
    #3
  4. Everything I've heard about seahorses indicates they cant be kept with other
    fish at all because they cant compete for food. They move way too slow, and
    will starve.

    John B wrote:

    > They are reef compatable -- BUT most seahorses like low current environments
    > conflicting with reef inhabitants liking strong currents..
    >
    > I'm checking out www.seahorse.org to see what else I can find.
    >
    > As for compatibility with other fish, seahorses are likely to get "spooked"
    > so to say by the other fish. Most fish will leave the horses alone, but the
    > horse doesn't know this and gets frightened, of course leading to stress, so
    > on and so forth.
    >
    > But anyways, have a look at www.seahorse.org I've been here for about an
    > hour now. Great site!
    >
    > hth
    > John
    >
    > "Rambo" <rambo@scientist(nospam).com> wrote in message
    > news:gu3htvk4si6nnrf8rcc00huc0mfmndjfu3@4ax.com...
    > > Would seahorses be compatible with a reef tank?
     
    Phil O'Connor, Dec 11, 2003
    #4
  5. not to mention the fish will out compete the horses for food and they will
    likely starve very quickly.

    kc

    "John B" <invigor@sasktel.net> wrote in message
    news:vth5qpq0abn791@corp.supernews.com...
    > They are reef compatable -- BUT most seahorses like low current

    environments
    > conflicting with reef inhabitants liking strong currents..
    >
    > I'm checking out www.seahorse.org to see what else I can find.
    >
    > As for compatibility with other fish, seahorses are likely to get

    "spooked"
    > so to say by the other fish. Most fish will leave the horses alone, but

    the
    > horse doesn't know this and gets frightened, of course leading to stress,

    so
    > on and so forth.
    >
    > But anyways, have a look at www.seahorse.org I've been here for about an
    > hour now. Great site!
    >
    > hth
    > John
    >
    > "Rambo" <rambo@scientist(nospam).com> wrote in message
    > news:gu3htvk4si6nnrf8rcc00huc0mfmndjfu3@4ax.com...
    > > Would seahorses be compatible with a reef tank?

    >
    >
     
    Dragon Slayer, Dec 11, 2003
    #5
  6. Rambo

    Acrylics Guest

    The refugium however, would be an excellent place for them IMO. The amount of
    available plankton, low current, and plantlife would make an ideal home IMHO.
    The problem is that the seahorses will eat much of the zooplankton in the
    refugium thereby semi-defeating part of the reason for having it in the first
    place. You'd still get much of the nutrient export though.

    James
     
    Acrylics, Dec 11, 2003
    #6
  7. Rambo

    B Guest

    tank raised Seahores are trained to eat frozen Mysis shrimp
    as soon as they are large enough to do so. see :
    www.oceanrider.com for tank raised Seahorses there are
    some others
    I agree put them in the refugium if yours is slow flowing or
    a species tank...


    "Rambo" <rambo@scientist(nospam).com> wrote in message
    news:gu3htvk4si6nnrf8rcc00huc0mfmndjfu3@4ax.com...
    > Would seahorses be compatible with a reef tank?
     
    B, Dec 13, 2003
    #7
  8. Rambo

    JCBlueEyes Guest

    > Would seahorses be compatible with a
    > reef tank?


    Yes but with a qualifier. It all depends on what the other inhabitants are.
    Seahorses are found on reefs and can handle strong currents fine, and can find
    calmer areas if needed. Most reef tanks do not have strong currents everywhere.

    Fish spooking seahorses?? Mmm ... how do they handle all those fish in the
    wild?? ;-)

    Yes more active fish can outcompete them for food but it all depends how many
    fish you have and how much you feed. It is a simple matter to train your
    seahorse to feed in a specific spot in the aquarium and to feed them using
    tweezers if necessary.

    Being stung by corals or anemones is a real problem and one needs to make sure
    you do not keep the seahorses in tanks with strongly stinging animals,
    especially if the tank is small.

    The other problem comes when the seahorses clasp on to corals, fanworm tubes,
    etc ... this can cause the corals to remain closed.

    Also the Seahorse.org site is very informative.

    From FAMA 2001 #24.

    There has been a lot of interest lately in keeping seahorses in reef aquaria.
    Although it is possible to do so, there are some things that need to be taken
    into consideration before doing so. Most reef tanks that house corals also have
    a great deal of water movement. When combined with overflows, it is not
    uncommon for seahorses to be trapped against, or even go over, them. Powerheads
    are also often used and can be death traps for seahorses if the intakes are not
    properly screened off. To keep seahorses in reef tanks one really must foresee
    all the possible ways that they could be injured and to take precautions
    against this happening.

    Many corals are powerful stingers, but these belong mainly to the stony coral
    families. Most soft corals and gorgonians have very little stinging ability and
    will not harm seahorses. However, since seahorses can grasp onto these corals
    with their tails they can cause the coral to retract its polyps. This can be a
    problem if the coral relies on its polyps to capture light to provide the
    energy it requires to survive. Fortunately in most cases, the coral will
    habituate to the constant irritation caused by the seahorse and will not
    retract its polyps as frequently as in the beginning. The observant aquarist
    should keep an eye on their soft corals and gorgonians to insure that they are
    not remaining closed for long periods of time.

    In the case of stony corals there are two main groupings to be considered. The
    small polyped stony (SPS) corals consist of genera that have small polyps that
    extend out of very small openings in the skeleton. These would include genera
    such as Acropora, Montipora, Pocillipora, Porities, Seriatopora and Stylophora.
    These SPS corals are generally considered to be weak stingers and should not
    irritate seahorses very much. However, the same precaution I mentioned for soft
    corals also applies to SPS corals. The second major grouping is the large
    polyped stony (LPS) corals. These include genera such as Catalaphyllia,
    Cynarina, Euphyllia, Plerogyra and Trachyphyllia that have large fleshy polyps,
    often with tentacles that can have powerful stinging cells. Of these Euphyllia
    and Catalaphyllia spp. are the strongest stingers, and any seahorses placed
    into tanks with these corals should be carefully observed.

    Despite what many people think, seahorses are quite effective swimmers and can
    hold their own in strong currents. However, in the confines of an aquarium, it
    is not impossible for them to come into contact with stinging corals if
    suddenly caught in a very strong current. The aquarist needs to take this into
    consideration when placing water returns and corals in the aquarium. People
    have been keeping fish with corals for several years now and the instances
    where fish have been taken by corals are few and far between, but it does
    happen occasionally. Seahorses, like any other fish, have a natural ability to
    avoid most powerful stinging corals, and the slightest touch is enough to
    reinforce this natural avoidance behaviour.

    Other invertebrates that seahorses should do well with include zoanthids,
    corallimorpharians (mushroom anemones), sponges, sea cucumbers, shrimp and the
    smaller detritus or algae feeding snails, worms and crabs. One notable
    exception is the elephant ear mushroom anemone (Amplexidiscus fenestrafer).
    This animal is an active feeder on small fish and will envelope them whole
    within its mantle then slowly digest them by extruding its digestive filaments
    into the space created. No small fish are safe with these animals in the tank.
     
    JCBlueEyes, Dec 13, 2003
    #8
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