Sick/injured Blue-green Chromis?

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by Tom Rhindress, Sep 14, 2004.

  1. I have 3 blue-green chromis in my tank. Normally they are highly
    active, zipping around in the upper water column in search of food.
    However one of them is now hanging listlessly in the upper corner of the
    tank, head up, normal breathing rate. Its dorsal and pelvic fins are
    ragged, not diseased looking like tailrot and finrot in freshwater fish,
    more like nibbled off. Tail is fine.

    I had a similar problem earlier when one of my two 3-stripe damsels was
    being overly aggressive and nipping the chromis. Caught him and
    returned him to LFS. Have never seen the remaining 3-stripe do the same
    behavior, he's rather docile. At that time the chromises actively hid
    in the rock work.

    Besides the 3 chromis and 1 3-stripe the other fish inhabitants are:
    2 false perculas
    1 mandarin
    1 bi-colored blenny

    Have never witnessed any aggressive behavior between them.
    There is a single peppermint shrimp, completely nocturnal and a
    detrivore crew of small hermits and snails

    40 gal wide breeder, lots of well established live-rock and water
    parameters good.

    Any ideas?




     
    Tom Rhindress, Sep 14, 2004
    #1
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  2. Perhaps a hermit was eating some of the fins while it was
    sleeping. This has happened to some. How is the fish now?

    Marc


    Tom Rhindress wrote:

    > I have 3 blue-green chromis in my tank. Normally they are highly
    > active, zipping around in the upper water column in search of food.
    > However one of them is now hanging listlessly in the upper corner of the
    > tank, head up, normal breathing rate. Its dorsal and pelvic fins are
    > ragged, not diseased looking like tailrot and finrot in freshwater fish,
    > more like nibbled off. Tail is fine.
    >
    > I had a similar problem earlier when one of my two 3-stripe damsels was
    > being overly aggressive and nipping the chromis. Caught him and
    > returned him to LFS. Have never seen the remaining 3-stripe do the same
    > behavior, he's rather docile. At that time the chromises actively hid
    > in the rock work.
    >
    > Besides the 3 chromis and 1 3-stripe the other fish inhabitants are:
    > 2 false perculas
    > 1 mandarin
    > 1 bi-colored blenny
    >
    > Have never witnessed any aggressive behavior between them.
    > There is a single peppermint shrimp, completely nocturnal and a
    > detrivore crew of small hermits and snails
    >
    > 40 gal wide breeder, lots of well established live-rock and water
    > parameters good.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    >
    >
    >


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    Marc Levenson, Sep 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. Tom Rhindress

    Craig Kaplan Guest

    Marc,

    Even though you have not witnessed it, the behavior you describe is
    typical of a fish that is being harassed. Have you tried removing this
    fish and placing him in a separate tank? If you do this, you will
    prove whether this is simply aggression or if there is somthing wrong
    with him. If, after a day or two, he begins swimming normally then you
    will know it is a case of aggression. If not, then you will know that
    there is a condition you need to identify and treat.

    If he is being chased, you can simply remove all of the fish, rearrange
    all of the rocks and then re-introduce the fish. When you do this,
    place the fish that has been in the corner first. Allow him some time
    to explore and find a spot where he feels comfortable. Then you can
    put the other fish in. You will need to watch all of them carefully.
    Don't forget to check on them once the lights go off as some chasing
    can occur then.

    Let us know what happens. Good luck!

    ck


    In article <s%M5d.1510$zc1.539@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com>, Marc
    Levenson <melev_spam_phobic@swbell.net> wrote:

    > Perhaps a hermit was eating some of the fins while it was
    > sleeping. This has happened to some. How is the fish now?
    >
    > Marc
    >
    >
    > Tom Rhindress wrote:
    >
    > > I have 3 blue-green chromis in my tank. Normally they are highly
    > > active, zipping around in the upper water column in search of food.
    > > However one of them is now hanging listlessly in the upper corner of the
    > > tank, head up, normal breathing rate. Its dorsal and pelvic fins are
    > > ragged, not diseased looking like tailrot and finrot in freshwater fish,
    > > more like nibbled off. Tail is fine.
    > >
    > > I had a similar problem earlier when one of my two 3-stripe damsels was
    > > being overly aggressive and nipping the chromis. Caught him and
    > > returned him to LFS. Have never seen the remaining 3-stripe do the same
    > > behavior, he's rather docile. At that time the chromises actively hid
    > > in the rock work.
    > >
    > > Besides the 3 chromis and 1 3-stripe the other fish inhabitants are:
    > > 2 false perculas
    > > 1 mandarin
    > > 1 bi-colored blenny
    > >
    > > Have never witnessed any aggressive behavior between them.
    > > There is a single peppermint shrimp, completely nocturnal and a
    > > detrivore crew of small hermits and snails
    > >
    > > 40 gal wide breeder, lots of well established live-rock and water
    > > parameters good.
    > >
    > > Any ideas?
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
     
    Craig Kaplan, Oct 1, 2004
    #3
  4. Tom Rhindress

    saltwaterliz

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2013
    Messages:
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    It is also possible that a nasty emerald crab could have traveled with you in the live rock they hide in the little crevices of the live rock we finally caught him so you might want to check for that too.
     
    saltwaterliz, Dec 21, 2013
    #4
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