Upgrading to a 150

Discussion in 'New to Reefing' started by Gdbyrd, May 2, 2013.

  1. Gdbyrd

    Gdbyrd life's a beach

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    Finally making the jump from a 47g tall to a 150g tank with a 100g sump. I don't plan on running a skimmer, but will fill the sump with a massive amount of chaeto. In my current tank I have a lot of LPS and I really like the movement they offer. I also have a couple softies that spread like weeds. It's nice to have them fill in big areas..but in a big tank I could see them being a real problem.

    It just seems like filling a 150g is going to be a daunting task. So much space..I'm going to have about 400# of live rock in there...So I should have plenty of places to put stuff.

    You guys with bigger tanks that made a jump like I am getting ready to do...how'd you plan for it livestock wise? Locally I can only find small quantities of stuff..and it's all pretty standard coral. I'm really excited about this, but I'm kinda psyching myself down in a lot of ways because I don't know where to go with this.

    I don't have a clue what fish I want to do either. I guess it's really going to depend on the type of tank I build....so lost : /
     
    Gdbyrd, May 2, 2013
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  2. Gdbyrd

    andysgirl8800 Blenny Badlands

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    You will be just fine! Going bigger is exciting! Even if you have limited local livestock options, start investigating online purchases from reputable vendors, such as LiveAquaria.com. Plan your shipment carefully around your work schedule, budget, and livestock choices, since it's an overnight shipment and you pay the overnight cost. You don't want live animals packed in a cooler sitting on your porch for 12 hours while you're at work. You can also check Craigslist for local reefers who may be able to frag a coral for your tank. Although just a small coral, with time and patience, it will grow beautifully in your tank.

    Aside from the additional "room for error" that a larger tank offers, you also have a broader selection of fish you can add. Most of the tangs/surgeon fish have minimum tank requirements of 75-125 gallons. You'll be able to add most tangs. You'll want to map out your fish choices carefully, with special consideration given to temperament. You'll want to add peaceful fish before you add semi-aggressive/aggressive fish to minimalize bullying and territorialism.

    Have fun with your upgrade build! Build it the way YOU want it.
     
    andysgirl8800, May 2, 2013
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  3. Gdbyrd

    Gdbyrd life's a beach

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    Thanks for the encouragement! That's my biggest problem...I really don't know what I want, lol. I like movement, so I think it'll mostly be an LPS dominated tank..but the majority of that stuff does well on sandy bottoms, not on rockwork. I like a lot of color, so I'd like to try incorporating more SPS. Just so many options...and I REALLY want to have some more clams. I had several in this tank before I moved it and unfortunately they didn't survive the transition.

    My first question: All of the rock he has is completely covered in hair algae. What's the best process to remove this stuff? There's probably about 200# in the tank, so it looks like a lot of work.

    Second question: The sand he has in there, should I replace about 50% or more of it and only use portions to seed it? The tank is 2-3 years old and he used the right type of sand.

    Thank you guys.
     
    Gdbyrd, May 2, 2013
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  4. Gdbyrd

    andysgirl8800 Blenny Badlands

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    I can help you with that! I've battled my OWN awful HA problems!! It will be a lot of work, but worth it in the end.

    You'll need the following:
    • several plastic bins/buckets (Home Depot all purpose orange ones or similar)
    • several gallons of clean salt water (for about 200#s, I'd suggest about 40 gallons)
    • hand-held NEW dish scrub brush (try the dollar store)
    • firm NEW toothbrushes (also try the dollar store)
    • turkey baster (ditto)
    • towels (to catch drips between buckets)
    Process:
    1. start with two buckets/bins side-by-side sitting on towels
    2. fill both about 3/4 full with clean salt water
    3. take one piece of the algae-infested rock and submerge it in the first bucket
    4. using your fingers, try to pull off as much of the algae as you can
    5. next, using your brushes, scrub all surfaces of the rock
    6. use the toothbrushes to get into any of the larger pores of the rock
    7. use the turkey baster to rinse of the rock above the first bucket
    8. transfer the now scrubbed rock into the second bucket for another rinse
    9. repeat with all rocks that are covered in HA, replacing the dirty water as needed
    Look closely at the bottom of the buckets for any inverts that have been accidently flushed out during your cleaning and determine if you want to keep them before you toss the water. This is not a guaranteed "cure" for the algae, but will start you off right when you put them back in the tank. You'll need to take other steps to minimize any future outbreaks, like bulking up your CUC (clean up crew), adding some herbivorous fish, keeping up with water changes, consider a UV sterilizer and/or DIY algae scrubber, changing your light bulbs on time, keeping your skimmer cleaned, keeping your temp and parameters stable, etc, etc, etc.
     
    andysgirl8800, May 2, 2013
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