What eats bristleworms?

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by George Patterson, Oct 15, 2006.

  1. I've heard that Hawkfish do. Does anything else eat them? I'd rather avoid the
    Hawkfish 'cause they also eat things like peppermint shrimp.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 15, 2006
    #1
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  2. George Patterson

    TheRock Guest

    Arrow crabs and 6 Line Wrasse.
    But why George ?!?!?!
    Bristle worms are our friends...

    "George Patterson" <grpphoto@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:R8tYg.9721$gx6.538@trnddc05...
    > I've heard that Hawkfish do. Does anything else eat them? I'd rather avoid
    > the Hawkfish 'cause they also eat things like peppermint shrimp.
    >
    > George Patterson
    > All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are
    > permanent.
     
    TheRock, Oct 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. George Patterson

    Peter Pan Guest

    I found my clean up crew rid my tank of the brisle worms. Blue and red Claw
    Hermits as well as Turbos Snail and emrald crabs. I didnt set out to get rid
    of them, the Clean up crew went into over time and really did a number for
    me.

    "TheRock" <none@none.com> wrote in message
    news:3gAYg.3117$Z46.2840@trndny05...
    > Arrow crabs and 6 Line Wrasse.
    > But why George ?!?!?!
    > Bristle worms are our friends...
    >
    > "George Patterson" <grpphoto@verizon.net> wrote in message
    > news:R8tYg.9721$gx6.538@trnddc05...
    > > I've heard that Hawkfish do. Does anything else eat them? I'd rather

    avoid
    > > the Hawkfish 'cause they also eat things like peppermint shrimp.
    > >
    > > George Patterson
    > > All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are
    > > permanent.

    >
    >
     
    Peter Pan, Oct 16, 2006
    #3
  4. TheRock wrote:

    > Bristle worms are our friends...


    Why?

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 16, 2006
    #4
  5. George Patterson

    Bryan Guest

    Small bristle worms can be ok but they get big. Today I found a huge one
    that I just set a trap in hopes of killing. Yes, I've read about the pros
    and cons of bristle worms; but I don't want something that big in my tank
    that's very mobile with strong stinging abilities.

    Just a while ago my lights went off. I waited a bit then grabbed the
    flashlight. My astrea snails, red, blue and other assorted hermit crabs
    were walking around the little bristle worms without even trying to eat
    them. I'm not so sure yet if hermits care about bristles. I'll keep
    watching though. I will say that I have a lot of hermits but my bristle
    worm population is rising.

    B


    "George Patterson" <grpphoto@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:RtBYg.8413$6D3.2566@trnddc01...
    > TheRock wrote:
    >
    >> Bristle worms are our friends...

    >
    > Why?
    >
    > George Patterson
    > All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are
    > permanent.
     
    Bryan, Oct 16, 2006
    #5
  6. George Patterson wrote:
    > TheRock wrote:
    >
    > > Bristle worms are our friends...

    >
    > Why?
    >

    Hi George,

    Check out these three articles by Ron Shimek:

    http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-03/rs/index.php Basic
    bristleworm information

    http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-04/rs/index.php Large worms
    found in aquaria

    http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2003-05/rs/index.php Small worms
    found in aquaria

    The second and third links are the most 'on-point' about how to regard
    your worm population. The bottom line is that the vast majority of
    worms that you're likely to have are beneficial scavengers or
    detrivores and that the few exceptions are not too difficult to remove
    manually.

    Vermicularly yours,

    Alex
     
    Tidepool Geek, Oct 16, 2006
    #6
  7. George Patterson

    Don Geddis Guest

    > TheRock wrote:
    >> Bristle worms are our friends...


    George Patterson <grpphoto@verizon.net> wrote on Mon, 16 Oct 2006:
    > Why?


    Because they are scavengers, that help clean up waste materials (e.g. excess
    food) in the aquarium.

    To turn the question around, why do you want to get rid of them?

    -- Don
    _______________________________________________________________________________
    Don Geddis don@geddis.org http://reef.geddis.org/
    If you were a pirate, you know what would be the one thing that would really
    make you mad? Treasure chests with no handles. How the hell are you supposed
    to carry it?! -- Deep Thoughts, by Jack Handey
     
    Don Geddis, Oct 16, 2006
    #7
  8. Don Geddis wrote:

    > To turn the question around, why do you want to get rid of them?


    Too many of them. I was thinking about getting a hawkfish, until I found that
    they eat things like the cleaner shrimp that I also would like to have. The
    various answers so far to my question (especially the Geek's links) have
    convinced me to keep them.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 17, 2006
    #8
  9. George Patterson

    Dr. Thompson Guest

    George Patterson wrote:
    >
    > Don Geddis wrote:
    >
    > > To turn the question around, why do you want to get rid of them?

    >
    > Too many of them. I was thinking about getting a hawkfish, until I found that
    > they eat things like the cleaner shrimp that I also would like to have. The
    > various answers so far to my question (especially the Geek's links) have
    > convinced me to keep them.


    If you're seeing a lot of bristleworms while your lights are on it
    could be a sign that you're overfeeding or, possibly, might not have
    enough water flow. With inadequate water flow the food will settle
    quickly on your live rock and substrate where the worms (and other
    various creatures that make up the "live" part of your live rock) will
    grab it.
     
    Dr. Thompson, Oct 17, 2006
    #9
  10. George Patterson

    Wayne Sallee Guest

    If you feel that you have too many of them, you can put
    some food in a panty hose, and remove the excess worms
    that way.

    Wayne Sallee
    Wayne's Pets
    Wayne@WaynesPets.com


    George Patterson wrote on 10/16/2006 10:28 PM:
    > Don Geddis wrote:
    >
    >> To turn the question around, why do you want to get rid of them?

    >
    > Too many of them. I was thinking about getting a hawkfish, until I found
    > that they eat things like the cleaner shrimp that I also would like to
    > have. The various answers so far to my question (especially the Geek's
    > links) have convinced me to keep them.
    >
    > George Patterson
    > All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are
    > permanent.
     
    Wayne Sallee, Oct 19, 2006
    #10
  11. George Patterson

    Cindy Guest

    * Wayne Sallee wrote, On 10/19/2006 1:48 PM:
    > If you feel that you have too many of them, you can put some food in a
    > panty hose, and remove the excess worms that way.
    >


    Oh, THANK you! Another use for old pantyhose, wonderful! LOL
    I already use them for holding carbon and such in canister filters.

    Cindy
     
    Cindy, Oct 19, 2006
    #11
  12. Wayne Sallee wrote:
    > If you feel that you have too many of them, you can put some food in a
    > panty hose, and remove the excess worms that way.


    Cool! Thanks.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 19, 2006
    #12
  13. George Patterson

    Wayne Sallee Guest

    Yea pantyhose are useful for a lot of things.

    Wayne Sallee
    Wayne's Pets
    Wayne@WaynesPets.com


    Cindy wrote on 10/19/2006 3:47 PM:
    > * Wayne Sallee wrote, On 10/19/2006 1:48 PM:
    >> If you feel that you have too many of them, you can put some food in a
    >> panty hose, and remove the excess worms that way.
    >>

    >
    > Oh, THANK you! Another use for old pantyhose, wonderful! LOL
    > I already use them for holding carbon and such in canister filters.
    >
    > Cindy
     
    Wayne Sallee, Oct 19, 2006
    #13
  14. Wayne Sallee wrote:
    > If you feel that you have too many of them,


    You should stop overfeeding your tank, eh?

    -K
     
    Kelsey Cummings, Oct 20, 2006
    #14
  15. George Patterson

    Bryan Guest

    I have the worms and I definitely don't overfeed. I have 3 big ones that I
    need to address. bunch of small ones...

    so what do you do with the hose Wayne?

    B

    "Kelsey Cummings" <kgc@microshaft.org> wrote in message
    news:45383b7a$0$34577$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...
    > Wayne Sallee wrote:
    >> If you feel that you have too many of them,

    >
    > You should stop overfeeding your tank, eh?
    >
    > -K
     
    Bryan, Oct 20, 2006
    #15
  16. Kelsey Cummings wrote:

    > You should stop overfeeding your tank, eh?


    Hard to stop when you haven't started. Currently, I have my live rock set up,
    some hitchhikers have appeared, and I have a few hermit crabs. That's all. No
    need to feed what isn't there.

    Still working on bringing the nitrate and phosphate levels down.

    George Patterson
    All successes in conservation are temporary. All defeats are permanent.
     
    George Patterson, Oct 20, 2006
    #16
  17. George Patterson

    Dr. Thompson Guest

    George Patterson wrote:
    > Kelsey Cummings wrote:
    >
    > > You should stop overfeeding your tank, eh?

    >
    > Hard to stop when you haven't started. Currently, I have my live rock set up,
    > some hitchhikers have appeared, and I have a few hermit crabs. That's all. No
    > need to feed what isn't there.
    >



    If it's a new tank (couple months old or less) I'd say wait for
    everything to get stable before dealing with the bristleworms. Most
    polychaetes are self-limiting (population-wise) and will probably do
    more good than harm in a tank. Once you add some active livestock in
    there you won't see them as much during the day.
     
    Dr. Thompson, Oct 21, 2006
    #17
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