what is that? Please help

Discussion in 'Invertebrates' started by qxcontinuum, Oct 8, 2009.

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  1. qxcontinuum

    bjohanson1234 .........

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    I also have to agree.

    I was in the same boat as you. All my life fresh water. Ran them perfectly, almost ran them on auto pilot.

    Switch to marine. Totally different animal. I would compare it to knowing how to take care of a lion because you had kittens growing up:twocents:

    I also wish you best of luck and do hope that everything does continue the way it is going.
     
    bjohanson1234, Oct 9, 2009
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  2. qxcontinuum

    dcantucson

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    I agree too, but I guess it's different strokes for different folks.
    I wish you good luck in reinventing this hobby.
    Hey everyone all experience and proven techniques are now out the window! There's a new kid in town! :claphands
     
    dcantucson, Oct 9, 2009
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  3. qxcontinuum

    qxcontinuum

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    Ok thanks everyone. My question was something else. I am a newbie in this domain but i did my lessons before and reading books and internet about reefs.

    I am not sure if anyone of you have done scuba diving. To see corals and marine life in the middle of the day you need powerfull light reflectors. Those corals are taken from those places and added in your tanks where they are getting 10 times more light than in their natural habit. Of course they will do fine and it''ll be like an explossion of happines but it'll only last less than normal

    Anyway, my anemone says hello to al of you and she's saying she is happier than in a retailer fish tank with even less light where was wondering the floor.

    here is she saying hello;

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEFh6j9-Km8"]YouTube - sea anemone[/ame]
     
    qxcontinuum, Oct 9, 2009
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  4. qxcontinuum

    bjohanson1234 .........

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    I have not been scuba diving, but have been snorkeling. I didnt seem to have any problem seeing the corals and marine life from 20 feet above.

    Like stated before, years and years of first hand experience versus reading something in a book or on the internet are completely different things.

    I have read many books and articles and not once have I read that MH is too much light for corals, or that 70 watts of light is good.

    I might have to look through my three reef keeping books again. Must have missed it.

    Once again, I wish you luck in your tank.
     
    bjohanson1234, Oct 9, 2009
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  5. qxcontinuum

    ccCapt Reef Hacker Moderator

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    FYI...there is no naturally occuring WHITE anemone. Do some research on bleached anemones due to lack of light.
    Did you have you powerheads turned off in that video, because I saw virtually no signs of flow.

    You seem to have everything under control. :shock: Good luck.
     
    ccCapt, Oct 9, 2009
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  6. qxcontinuum

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    I have been scuba diving. As a matter of fact, I am a certified Dive Master. I have been diving in some of the most exotic places in the world. Not only have I never had to use a light to see corals in the daytime, if there is a full moon you do not even need a light to see animals on night dives.

    Your anemone is bleached. From a lack of light. Like ccCapt said, healthy anemones are not white.

    Comparing a 150 watt light bulb over a tank is NOTHING to the power of the sun's light. Even penetrating through 35 feet or so of water. You are just wrong about so many things.

    I'd like to see the response you get if you try to post your "facts" on other reefing forums. You'd get laughed off those sites. Yet you believe that you, with one month of experience, know better than everyone else out there with a tank that has successfully been keeping livestock for years.
     
    Bifferwine, Oct 9, 2009
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  7. qxcontinuum

    Sharkie The Damsel Defender

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    Corals do great in strong light and multiplying until a point where they just stop. Their life spawn is reduced this way (this i know for sure from a marine biologist)

    I'd like to know what kinda of marine biologist told you that crap. it doesn't shorten their life span at all...


    I am not sure if anyone of you have done scuba diving. To see corals and marine life in the middle of the day you need powerfull light reflectors. Those corals are taken from those places and added in your tanks where they are getting 10 times more light than in their natural habit. Of course they will do fine and it''ll be like an explossion of happines but it'll only last less than normal
    I have no clue what you're talking about, like biff said you don't need a flashlight to see corals in the daytime, and even sometimes at night you don't need one.... If you've gone scubadiving in a place where you do need light then i suggest going to a less polluted area.

    Anyway, my anemone says hello to al of you and she's saying she is happier than in a retailer fish tank with even less light where was wondering the floor.

    actually your nem is probably screaming for some lighting. see how your nem is white? that means its bleached from a lack of PROPER lighting. petstores sell them fast so they don't use the proper lighting. ours usually sells out of nems the day they get them so its typical to find them wandering the floors looking for a place where they get enough movement (you NEED some powerheads in that tank, there is no flow whatso ever in that video) and light.

    honestly I don't see where you are getting your facts from... everything seems to be as if you know it all from reading. If anything the way to learn is by EXPERIENCE which we have allllll had because of trying to do the same thing you are... knowing it from reading.
    Freshwater and salt are two completely different subjects light night and day. Fresh is pretty easy and the fish are pretty hardy. salt has to have a SPECIFIC balance of everything and MUST stay at a constant level and the fish are far less hardy. I know this because I have both fresh and salt tanks annnnnd I've got 7 years as a marine bio student/monterey bay aquarium aquarist under my belt PLUS its my major in school. I don't mean to sound rude but you should really listen to these people and get your facts straight before trying to do anything. you need new filters, new lights, less fish, and a lot more willingness to listen.
     
    Sharkie, Oct 9, 2009
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  8. qxcontinuum

    Wes888

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    What everyone said.

    By the way, qxcontinuum, Sharkie studies marine biology and works in an Aquarium. They don't suggest this thing out of nothing.
     
    Wes888, Oct 9, 2009
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  9. qxcontinuum

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    Silly Larry! He must've read an article that told him there are no waves in the ocean. Didn't you know it's a proven fact that water movement kills corals?!?!
     
    Bifferwine, Oct 9, 2009
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  10. qxcontinuum

    qxcontinuum

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    so you guys are saying there is no such thing as anemone with white tentacles?

    Power heads are no good in fish tanks.
    The flow pumps are the latest discovery that is close to the natural sea currents.
    yes were tourned off to do pictures!
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2009
    qxcontinuum, Oct 9, 2009
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  11. qxcontinuum

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    Some anemones have white tentacles with color at the tips. Those are condylactis anemones.

    It doesn't look like you have a condy.

    But no, straight up white anemones are close to death. It means the colorful photosynthetic zooxanthellae (bacteria) in their flesh has all died out due to a lack of light. The only nutrition a white anemone can get is from eating meat, since it cannot photosynthesize anymore.

    On the other hand, a healthy anemone will get most of its nutrition from photosynthesis and will rarely need to be fed meat. An anemone that is bleached and surviving solely off of meat will not live long, as it cannot sustain them.
     
    Bifferwine, Oct 9, 2009
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  12. qxcontinuum

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    I aint even touchin this one
     
    yote, Oct 9, 2009
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  13. qxcontinuum

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    Haha! I'm pretty sure this is what all the mods are feeling like right now: :frustrat::frustrat::frustrat:
     
    Bifferwine, Oct 9, 2009
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  14. qxcontinuum

    qxcontinuum

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    I really wonder how you guys know what are the characteristics of this anemone and how color shows her status of health if none of you can identify her.

    It's a dahlia anemone (very hard and common)

    She lives on food and has short white or red tentacles and it's very common on UK and norvegian coasts.

    again doctor google!
     
    qxcontinuum, Oct 9, 2009
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  15. qxcontinuum

    bjohanson1234 .........

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    bjohanson1234, Oct 9, 2009
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  16. qxcontinuum

    qxcontinuum

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    qxcontinuum, Oct 9, 2009
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  17. qxcontinuum

    bjohanson1234 .........

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    I honestly dont see any resemblance to the nem in that pic and the nem in your tank.
     
    bjohanson1234, Oct 9, 2009
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  18. qxcontinuum

    qxcontinuum

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    qxcontinuum, Oct 9, 2009
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  19. qxcontinuum

    bjohanson1234 .........

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    you do realize that you just posted a picture of a frog sitting on a flower dont you?
    [​IMG]

    and notice how in all your pictures and the pictures in the link that I posted, te anenome has some sort of coloring. Yours does not. Most anenomes reproduce b splitting. So the color wll still be tere even if it is a yound anenome.

    Please stat listenng to the advice people are trying to give you. We are here to help you. We have all been where you are right now and have made mistakes. Use our mistakes to help you get through the start up of your tank.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2009
    bjohanson1234, Oct 9, 2009
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  20. qxcontinuum

    qxcontinuum

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    lol my mistake on the first one, this is the flower where the anemone takes the name and resemblance from, how about this one;

    [​IMG]
     
    qxcontinuum, Oct 9, 2009
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