Why are anemones classed as hard to keep ?

Discussion in 'Invertebrates' started by Lesely, Apr 28, 2014.

  1. Lesely

    Lesely

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    Hi. Every forum I go to suggests that anemones are difficult to keep ? I understand they have to go into a matureish tank but once they are in what's all the hype about ? I have personally found them to be one of the easiest things in my tank. ? Is something going to happen in the future that I don't know about ? What's the reason they are classed as so tricky & difficult ? Thanks. ! P.s I have 6 of them image.jpg
     
    Lesely, Apr 28, 2014
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  2. Lesely

    salt_for_brains Alabama Reefer VIP Member

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    Good question Lesely and I will try and answer it for you. Generally, a mature tank has more stable water parameters and also gives the reefkeeper time to learn their tank. You have BTA's which are the easier of the clown hosting anemones even though they are still classified as difficult. BTA's can be pretty resiliant in a lot of different conditions.

    Magnifica (ritteri), Sabaes (crispa, malu), Carpet (gigantea, haddoni) are a few of the even more demanding species. Each anemone has their own set of special needs and setting up your tank to support those needs is crucial in having success. These anemones do not ship as well, may have infections, may need to be treated or may arrive bleached.

    Knowing how to handle adverse situations is important. Picking out a healthy speciment is also a big factor. A new reefer may not know what a healthy sabae anemone is supposed to look like and pick out a pretty white translucent one that is bleached and very sick. When you get to the more demanding species named above strong lighting, flow and paramters have to be dialed in even more. For example, a gigantea loves a lot of flow where a haddoni doesn't want near as much. It can be very difficult to tell the two apart since they are so similar. The malu is very delicate and wants to be in a deep sandbed so a 2 inch sandbed may not be enough to keep it happy. The ability to give the anemone what it needs so it doesn't wander about the tank stinging and killing corals is also another reason they can be difficult. The size some of these anemones can achieve in captivity is another reason some of them are more difficult.

    Some anemones don't get along well together and chemical warfare can/will be used thus crippling the weaker anemone or both. There are many other factors that make anemones difficult to keep and I have just touched on some of my top reasons. I am glad you are having success with yours but remember not everyone have that same success. Researching your specimen, setting up your tank to support that specimen and picking out a healthy specimen are huge keys to success in the home aquarium.

    BTA's are beautiful but remember their sting isn't nearly as powerful as the others mentioned here. They can adapt better then the others I mentioned but that still doesn't make them easy. Just keep doing what you are doing because it appears you have some beautiful specimens:thumbsup:
     
    salt_for_brains, Apr 28, 2014
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  3. Lesely

    Lesely

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    Thank you so much for the info. I did realize that there were many different anemones but didn't realize the care of each was very different. As I haven't got any of the others and apparently i have lucked out and got the easier of the species to look after (thank god ). I wont be getting any more especially if they are much harder to look after. Thanks for the lesson it is one of many more I need to learn.
    Thanks a ton.
     
    Lesely, Apr 28, 2014
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  4. Lesely

    emmett0122

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    That's great info I know from my experience with them has been mixed my first bta got hurt when the lady from Petco picked it off the rock so it was a fail from the word go as wouldn't attach. The second was on a walk about on the side glass and got chopped by my power head then I got my haddon Carprt nem but it was where I couldn't feed it and it stayed in the shady spots of the tank and I think that had a lot to do with it eating my fish. So for now no news in my tank maybe a rose bta later.
     
    emmett0122, Apr 28, 2014
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  5. Lesely

    Lesely

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    wow, i have obviously been very lucky. Stick with what i have got i reckon. lol
     
    Lesely, Apr 28, 2014
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  6. Lesely

    Aquarian

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    I think they list them like that to protect them from peoples stupidity. I mean let's face it the nem knows how to take care of it's self. I'm sure they are not sitting around on the reef having little family chats about why it's a bad idea to walk out of the ocean, get on a plane fly half way around the world just so some lazy SOB can stare at you in a glass box :confused::D
     
    Aquarian, Apr 28, 2014
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  7. Lesely

    finestbeast

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    Im still cycling my first saltwater tank but one of my goals is to have one or two anoms. Im not in a huge rush especially since I was told by friends to wait a few monthes. BTW Lesley...love your tank.
     
    finestbeast, Apr 29, 2014
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  8. Lesely

    Aquarian

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    Your tank needs to be mature and stable it takes about a year for a tank to stabilize and just as long to learn how to maintain a healthy tank. Yes you can add a nem early on but you would be flirting with disaster and trying to learn on the fly. Just take it slow and do lots of research you will have much more enjoyment from your tank.
     
    Aquarian, Apr 29, 2014
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  9. Lesely

    finestbeast

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    I am...its just hard...freshwater isnt very picky...but I want to do it correctly...hence my 20 posts in 2 days...lol...you guys are a wealth of knowledge...
     
    finestbeast, Apr 29, 2014
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  10. Lesely

    salt_for_brains Alabama Reefer VIP Member

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    +1 and another one of my pet peeves is if you can't spell anemone you haven't researched nearly enough:D
     
    salt_for_brains, Apr 29, 2014
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  11. Lesely

    Aquarian

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    I can spell it I just don't WANT to:D
    A N E M O N E :p
     
    Aquarian, Apr 29, 2014
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  12. Lesely

    salt_for_brains Alabama Reefer VIP Member

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    Lol------ I wasn't referring to you kind sir;)
     
    salt_for_brains, Apr 29, 2014
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  13. Lesely

    ReeferRob

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    Ritteris are notoriously bad shippers. You get them 1 of 3 ways, healthy and raring to go, damaged or a milkshake in a bag. This is the reason they're so expensive and I've undertaken the task of trying captive propagation. There's a better than 50% chance they're going to arrive dead or dying. :(

    Here's another one of those tidbits that comes from having transshipped hundreds of them. NEVER, EVER open that anemone milkshake bag, it's another one of those things you'll only do once. You can't get the smell off you, not tomato juice, Oxyfresh or lemon juice.

    Long tentacle anemones are a lot more forgiving than are ritteris and they ship a lot better too. They like a nice deep sand bed to burrow down and grab the glass bottom of your aquarium. NEVER EVER under any circumstances buy one that it totally white, it's days are numbered.

    Sebaes are a little more hardy than LT anemones, same care.

    Carpets are pretty easy, at least for me they are. Do be aware, their sting is one of the most potent of the host anemones, the Indonesian Fire Anemone is about the only one I can think of off the top of my head that will make you sick from their sting.

    Bubble tips are the hardiest, mine breed like rabbits. Brought the wife's tank home with 7, after the stress of the move and a 60% water change in 3 weeks we had 11 in a Red Sea 130D, lol. The current number right now is 6 and I think the big one's getting ready to split again.


    ALL anemones like some flow. Ritteris would be at home in the spin cycle of your washing machine, lol. The more flow I put on my 4 the more they open up.

    I don't buy into the wait a year thing that's running around these days. I had a ritteri in the 240 6 months after I set it up and it did great. I'd say this, make damn sure your tank has cycled and you know what you're doing BEFORE you make that purchase, especially a $100-$200 ritteri. There is a finite supply of these creatures in the wild, tread with caution. Come here and ask, I don't think there are too many anemones I haven't had from ritteris to Indonesian Fire Anemones. I'm always happy to help out.

    It also bears note, be careful with their sting. It's much like a bee sting, you may be immune to it today, tomorrow you might end up in the hospital. Indonesian Fire Anemones have that name for a reason, handle them with gloves or with a new fish bag, you have been warned. One got me when we had the shop and I was sick for 3 days from it. Volitan lionfish stings are a cakewalk compared to those bastards!
     
    ReeferRob, May 10, 2014
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  14. Lesely

    Lesely

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    HI, I don't know about other types of anemones, but I have bought 5 severely bleached BTA's and all bar one have survived. They now have color, eat well ! IT takes time and patients but I cant stand going to a LFS and seeing these poor things bleached, sick and dying and half the store workers don't even realize they are going to die. So I buy them and do my best. I have managed to sell 2 of my first recovery patients to great tank owners and they are still thriving.
    I don't know much about any other type of anemones, but one day I may venture into that world. lol
     
    Lesely, May 10, 2014
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  15. Lesely

    ReeferRob

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    I'm the same way Lesely, I can't resist something that I might be able to save. Most of the time I can, once in a while, despite my best efforts, that animal is too far gone to be saved but I know I at least tried.
     
    ReeferRob, May 10, 2014
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  16. Lesely

    monique

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    I have rescued 2. first one through stupidity. first tank- i bought a pair of clarkies and a sabea anemone that was badly bleached, the tank and salt. brought it home set it up and threw them in. i have poisoned them through stupidity, cooked them through stupidity and moved them into a bigger tank 3 times and i still have them. that anemone is the toughest tank resident i have ever had- i don't understand why its still alive. then i rescued a bubbletip from a dying store last yr, that is doing great now. he was badly bleached too. but i do agree you need a more mature tank to do really well with them. my last move was 1.5 yr ago and they are doing gangbusters now. big difference from before. however you guys will be happy to know i learned a lot, do lots of research, have every book i can get my hands on and am a lot more careful what i buy. i want my stock to thrive, not suffer in silence
     
    monique, May 10, 2014
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  17. Lesely

    ReeferRob

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    One thing I will say, put a new anemone at the BOTTOM of the tank. It will move to where it is getting the correct light. If you have dimmable LEDs, turn them down to 60% and bring them up 10% per week.
     
    ReeferRob, May 11, 2014
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  18. Lesely

    Elaine Curin

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    I know this is a thread from 2014 but I just had to comment on what a beautiful tank this is!!!! How many Gallons is your tank?
     
    Elaine Curin, Jul 18, 2018
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  19. Lesely

    Rcpilot

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    Looks like Lesley hasn't been here in over a year. She might be still receiving PM's if you want to try and contact her that way. Reefers are usually happy to share pics.
     
    Rcpilot, Aug 13, 2018
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