Battery Backup

Discussion in 'Lighting, Filtration & Other Equipment' started by jswinberlin, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. jswinberlin

    jswinberlin

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    I've only had my tank up for about a month and I had planned on installing a battery backup at least for the heater. However, I thought maybe I was just being paranoid since we don't normally have power outages. Go figure, in the past 2 days we've had multiple power outages and my temperature dropped from about 79 degrees to 75 degrees.

    I don't have much in the tank yet, so there isn't a real big concern at this point. But, I wouldn't want something like this to happen when I have hundreds of dollars of stock in the aquarium.

    What's the best practice for avoiding this? Am I just being paranoid? My house temp is normally not below 65 degrees. Does anyone have a battery backup installed on their tanks? I'm looking at one designed for computers.

    Thanks!
    ~Jerry
     
    jswinberlin, Jan 25, 2011
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  2. jswinberlin

    x19 VIP Member

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    I not too long ago installed a computer battery backup on my tank, but just to run the pumps. Aquarium heaters just draw too much electricity to be powered for any real time on a battery backup unit.

    Most folks would recommend investing in a generator for the chance of an extended power outage. I'll go that route eventually I'm sure, but for now I just have a small tank and the battery backup will give me about 4 - 6 hours of flow in the tank.
     
    x19, Jan 25, 2011
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  3. jswinberlin

    sen5241b

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    Computer battery backups or UPSs do NOT last long and they are expensive. One thing you have to consider is whether someone will be home to turn on the alternate power source. People with large tanks generally have small generators to run pumps and heaters only but someone needs to be there to switch it on. Completely automated alternate power sources can easily cost thousands.

    One inexpensive plan you can try would be to get battery powered air pumps that will provide some flow and then put only the heater on the computer UPS. Some tank equipment may not run off UPSs unless they "simulate sine wave power".

    Google the Azoo Battery Backup Pump.
     
    sen5241b, Jan 25, 2011
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  4. jswinberlin

    jswinberlin

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    Hadn't thought about air flow, etc...stupid question, but how important is this.
     
    jswinberlin, Jan 25, 2011
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  5. jswinberlin

    x19 VIP Member

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    Water flow is the most important aspect to maintain in a power outage. It ensures the nitrogen cycle continues and prevents the water from becoming toxic. I believe 4 hours of no flow is enough for your water to begin to become dangerous to your livestock.
     
    x19, Jan 25, 2011
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