Do mangroves have to be seeded in sand?

Discussion in 'Lighting, Filtration & Other Equipment' started by SalteeDogg, May 1, 2010.

  1. SalteeDogg

    SalteeDogg

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    holding some mangroves in my sump temporarily until my other tank get built. I didn't bury the roots in the sand and about a week later the mangroves are not looking as good. Do I need to bury them? Reason I didn't is because my refugium was full of rock and rock rubble so it would of been a pain burying them. Any body if the roots need to be buried?
     
    SalteeDogg, May 1, 2010
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  2. SalteeDogg

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    I don't know the answer, but send a PM to d2mini. He has had mangroves in his system.
     
    Bifferwine, May 1, 2010
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    project5k

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    and then let us know what you find out...
     
    project5k, May 5, 2010
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  4. SalteeDogg

    BL1 ............. Moderator

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    PLACEMENT:

    There are a variety of methods for placing newly acquired mangroves in your system, as well as many things to avoid when doing so.

    Ideally, marine mud would be a good choice, which would promote natural root development. There are two brands that I am aware of. They are Aragomax Marine Mud by Carebsea, and Miracle-mud by (????).

    I'm sure there are other choices as well. Talk to other aquarists, your local society or your local fish-store for more options.

    Of course, mud isn't your only option. Mangroves will also root in many types of porous rock as well. Limestone is a favored choice by some mangrove-keepers. A good method for achieving attachment is through the use of rubber bands or by gently sandwiching the roots between two rocks.
    Still another method used by some aquarists to promote elongated root growth similar to that found in nature, is to suspend the roots a few inches from the aquarium bottom using Styrofoam floats. This will allow the roots to slowly grow downward until they reach the system bottom and form "legs".

    Many aquarists have also had success utilizing various sand beds. If this is the route you chose, placing the roots in plastic plant baskets filled with heavy substrate would be a good idea.
    Mangroves in the Reef Aquarium - Advanced Reef Topics
     
    BL1, May 5, 2010
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