Water changes..

Discussion in 'Water Chemistry' started by devicore16, Aug 26, 2008.

  1. devicore16

    devicore16

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    I'd like to know how to do water changes... like do you just pre-mix the salt in water and instantly add it to the tank, or just let the water cycle first before adding it.. please tell it to me step by step, coz im new to this..for my 63 gallon reef,LPS & SPS, what maintenance should i do to make sure everythig will be in good shape, thanks!
     
    devicore16, Aug 26, 2008
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  2. devicore16

    dolphins8426

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    The general rule of thumb is to change 10-15 gallons of water per week. It's pretty simple. Make sure you use RO water. Eaither with your RO filtration or you can buy it at your lfs, never use tap water. Just mix the salt in a bucket and check with your hydrometer to make sure it is where you want it to be. I also have an extra pump and a heater I put in the bucket to make sure it is all dissolved and pretty close to the same temp in my main tank. I usally make my salt the night before and let it mix over night then recheck before my water change with my hydrometer to make sure everything is a ok. JMO
     
    dolphins8426, Aug 26, 2008
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  3. devicore16

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    Dolphins got it pretty well covered.
    Just start it mixing a day or 2 ahead of time.Just mix up enough for 10 to 20%.
     
    yote, Aug 26, 2008
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  4. devicore16

    Ryan

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    My first water change was a 10%. Then I did a 20%. I premixed the water and salt and let it sit for some time until it was totally disolved. Make sure your water is the correct temp before going into your tank.
     
    Ryan, Aug 27, 2008
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  5. devicore16

    lightcs4 Loving to learn

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    I do 10% a week. It seems to keep everything going pretty well.
     
    lightcs4, Aug 27, 2008
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  6. devicore16

    SSalty Team Liquid Force

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    A brute 35 gallon garbage container is your best friend when doing water changes.
     
    SSalty, Aug 27, 2008
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  7. devicore16

    devicore16

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    thanks for the feedbacks guyS! REALLY appreciated it! but i wonder is it possible to use tap water for water change but treating it first.. like puting anti chlorine stuffs, etc..
     
    devicore16, Aug 27, 2008
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  8. devicore16

    lightcs4 Loving to learn

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    It's generally not recommended to use tap water as there are usually excessive heavy metals, phosphates, and chemicals in the water. Using RO or RO/DI is best for the tank. That said, I have exceptional water in my area and use a filter in the water line. It's still not the best way to do it but it works. I was dumping the water from the dehumidifier and wondered how good that water might be for the tank. I won't try it though as I don't have a TDS meter.
     
    lightcs4, Aug 27, 2008
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  9. devicore16

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    Tap water is really bad to use for 99% of people. A tap water conditioner will remove chlorine and chloramine, but it won't remove heavy metals, phosphate or nitrate. Most people that use tap water have bad algae problems because of it.
     
    Bifferwine, Aug 28, 2008
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  10. devicore16

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    Not to mention,Depending on how old the house you live in is,all the plumbing could be copper piping.Which can leach copper into your water.
    It'd be safer to get either destilled water,or your local wal-mart or bi-lo may have an RO machine.
    I use RO water from wal-mart,cost me 33 cents a gallon.
     
    yote, Aug 28, 2008
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  11. devicore16

    kevinsimons

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    Also - my 2cents - don't waste your money on a hydrometer - they're inacurate, cheap and flimsy (I went through 3 before I gave up and bought a portable refractometer).

    Here's what I do when I do a water change: (this I gleaned from the board and have modified it a bit):

    Top off your tank with fresh RO/DI water before you do anything else.

    Turn off all your water circulation.

    Use a small brush to scrape your rocks to dislodge any algae. Scoop up any that rises to the surface with a net.

    THEN, use a small airhose to siphon out grunge, gunk, filaments and other detritus that accumulates on rocks. Don't get near your substrate with this hose or it will clog.

    Then use a bigger diameter hose to finish sucking the rest of the water - if you have algae accumulating on your sand bed - suck it out using this hose (don't worry about losing your sand - you'll get it back later on).

    After you've finished filling the waste water bucket, get your algae pad out and clean the glass. Start at the bottom of the glass (by the substrate) and firmly draw the pad up to the water surface - then rinse it out in the waste water bucket. Repeat until you've completed cleaning the glass (always using the waste water to rinse out and clean your pad).

    Dump the water - but before you dump the very bottom of the waste water bucket , grab a tight-weave strainer, dumping the rest of the water through the strainer to catch your sand. Then re-deposit the newly cleaned sand in the tank.

    DON'T FORGET TO TURN YOUR PUMPS BACK ON!!!!
     
    kevinsimons, Aug 28, 2008
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