Emergency--sick fish, help!

Discussion in 'Reef Fishes' started by Keaton, Jan 14, 2009.

  1. Keaton

    Keaton

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    Last night I purchased a new Lemonpeel..... She looked fine at the LFS, no Ich or anything...we drip acclimated her for 45 minutes once we got home and she was pretty active. This morning I found her hiding behind a rock close to the bottom of the tank and it looks like she is breathing really fast. I fed the fish and she did not respond to the food at all. She has moved a little, but not very much. I also got some live rock rubble for the refugium and some more snails....and it looks like I had a small spike in the nitrates over night. Is there anything in particular that might cause the lemonpeel to be acting like this? Should I be worried, or could it just be natural due to the new environment? My wife also said that she thought she saw some brownish marks on her side, that werent there yesterday....but I have not been able to get the fish to turn around so I can see that side of her. It does not look like she has been picked on either. She is the biggest fish in the tank, and the other fish are fine.

    My Paramaters are:
    Nitrates 10ppm
    Nitrite 0ppm
    Ammonia 0ppm
    Alkalinity 300ppm
    Ph 8.0

    The only thing I added since I put her in is Stress Zyme.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2009
    Keaton, Jan 14, 2009
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  2. Keaton

    Keaton

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    Update: I've been observing the fish since I did a water change this morning and I've noticed that the puffer IS giving her warning shots so to speak. She's got a good size nip out of her dorsal fin that only a puffer could leave. He's not chasing her all over the place but every once in a while he goes at her to reming her that he's there. Do i need to quarantine one of them or will they figure it out on their own??
     
    Keaton, Jan 14, 2009
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  3. Keaton

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    They will probably figure it out on their own, but there's still the chance that the bullying will lead to the death of the lemonpeel. You have to make that choice if you want to risk it.
     
    Bifferwine, Jan 14, 2009
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  4. Keaton

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    +1 Biff
     
    yote, Jan 14, 2009
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  5. Keaton

    Oscarsdad608

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    + 1 On Yote's +1 of Biffers comment.
     
    Oscarsdad608, Jan 14, 2009
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  6. Keaton

    Keaton

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    The Lemonpeel has died. I am returning the puffer. :(
     
    Keaton, Jan 14, 2009
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  7. Keaton

    Altohombre The Tennis Pro Reefer

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    good choice. Although puffers are pretty cool they can be deadly aggressive as you have found out. Lemon peels are a great color, they have a habit of nipping at corals though so thats why less people have them.
     
    Altohombre, Jan 14, 2009
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  8. Keaton

    doom239

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    In some instances, your new tank mate will be chased and harassed by one or all of your existing tank mates.

    Solution 1: A plastic spaghetti strainer (found at your local discount store) can be used to contain a tank bully within the aquarium for several hours until the new arrival adjusts to its surroundings. Just float the perforated plastic basket in the aquarium. Net the tank bully and place in the floating basket for approximately four hours while the new arrival adjusts to your aquarium. Never place the new arrival in this basket; the new specimen must get familiar with your aquarium. By placing the tank bully in a perforated basket, you'll reduce the stress on your newest tank mate.

    Solution 2: A perforated plastic lighting grid can be purchased at your local hardware store to cut down the width of your aquarium. This grid may be used to section off a small portion of the aquarium to separate territorial or aggressive fish from the newest tank mate. After the new addition adjusts to the unfamiliar environment, the divider can be removed.
     
    doom239, Jan 14, 2009
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