New but excited

Discussion in 'New to Reefing' started by ReelNorth, Dec 24, 2007.

  1. ReelNorth

    ReelNorth

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    Hey all.

    This looks like a really great forum.

    I have been keeping fish for a few years, starting with freshwater planted to african cichlids, and now to WC Moba Frontosa. I have always been fascinated by saltwater, since my uncle had a large reef tank in his wall I remember from when I was a young lad.

    I am looking at a fish with live rock setup, and have some questions.

    I currently have a 125 gallon (72x18x24" tall) that is not drilled. I will be drilling it to accomodate a sump and installing the overflows etc.

    The sump that seems to be available locally is a 35 g acrylic.

    I am looking at getting some base rock and live rock, protein skimmer, but from there, I am not exactly sure what other things I need.

    I love the looks of triggerfish, but I guess they get a little big. What other things might I need to add - lighting etc, and what sort of fish and other animals would be recommended.

    I appreciate all the help in advance.

    Cheers
     
    ReelNorth, Dec 24, 2007
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  2. ReelNorth

    FNG44601

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    Welcome,The only thing I see you haven't stated is Live Sand/or some sort of substrate! FOWLR is definately a good start up...... Enjoy your journey- Triggers are beautiful fish
     
    FNG44601, Dec 24, 2007
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  3. ReelNorth

    bobby I like to do bad things.

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    Welcome to the site.
     
    bobby, Dec 24, 2007
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  4. ReelNorth

    ReelNorth

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    I was going to do live sand

    Do you need a refugium for this type of tank?
     
    ReelNorth, Dec 24, 2007
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  5. ReelNorth

    UnderwaterWorld

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    You don't need a refigium but they do help

    You do need a protein skimmer though and a good amount of live rock to do your filtration.
     
    UnderwaterWorld, Dec 24, 2007
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  6. ReelNorth

    ReelNorth

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    I've been seeing 1.5-2 lbs per gallon. I want to do the whole tank right, right from the start. What lights? What kind of fish could go with a trigger? Will the trigger eat the crabs etc?

    I have too many unknowns to even ask the right questions
     
    ReelNorth, Dec 24, 2007
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  7. ReelNorth

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    Hello and welcome!
     
    Bifferwine, Dec 24, 2007
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  8. ReelNorth

    Alexander

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    welcome to the forum
     
    Alexander, Dec 24, 2007
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  9. ReelNorth

    UnderwaterWorld

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    I would go for 1.5 lbs or a little higher, I've had 2 lbs and it looks nice if you set it up right.

    For lights I would look into T5s or Metal Halides if your going to want corals which I would definetely do. But if you only want fish then the lights aren't an issue and just get some power compacts or something if you want.

    Yes on the Trigger, but I personally would go for a reef tank, and you need is better lights really but good luck!!!
     
    UnderwaterWorld, Dec 24, 2007
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  10. ReelNorth

    fatman

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    When I saw ReelNorth I was hoping for another Alaskan, but ther are not a lot of us doing Reefs up here in Alaska. If I were you I would look at getting the largest cheap glass tank you can fit under your main tank for a sump tank. Bigger is always better. If for no other reason than the old saying that "The solution to pollution is dilution." The larger amount of volume a reef tank and its sump holds the slower the inherent pollution problems become drastic. I say inherent because everybody makes problems in their tank especially in the beginning. Too heavy of feedings, too heavy a load (too many fish), and inadequate water top offs, plain ole tinkeritis and for many more reasons. If your going to drill your main tank you can surely drill a glass sump tank. Sump filters, trickle and others are over rated and over priced. Spend the money you will save on a good quality skimmer and use plenty of live rock. HQI metal halides are great and you can always supplement with different spectrum power compact lights to get the color of light you like for viewing. I would recommend at least three 150 watt metal halides for mixed coral with your tank and bump up to three 250 watt metal halides if you think you will ever plan on using the tank principally for SPS coral. The price difference between 150 and 250 watt metal halides is small, and you should not have to worry about heat problems from high wattage lights in Ontario, especially with a large sump. Fans over a sumps water surface is typically all that is needed for tank cooling in the cooler climates.
     
    fatman, Dec 25, 2007
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  11. ReelNorth

    reeffreak

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    Thats it......no long winded speech?
    Whats up with that?
     
    reeffreak, Dec 25, 2007
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  12. ReelNorth

    reeffreak

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    Welcome to the site!

    Triggers and reef systems don't go good together.Although there are a couple of reef safe-ish triggers,most aren't the ideal candidate for a reef.

    From what I understand,you sound like your going FOWLR system.I would go with 1lb per gallon of live rock and keep it low.Triggers love to rearrange the rocks.Knocking over rocks could break the glass.For this kind of system,no special lighting is needed,standard florescents will work fine.Although not necessary,I recommend a skimmer too as well as the sump that your planning on.

    Now if your plans are going reef,than your need better lighting.A sump,refugium and skimmer is even more important.We can get into that,if thats in your plan.

    Good luck
     
    reeffreak, Dec 25, 2007
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  13. ReelNorth

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    I know... So out of character for me. I didn't have time to properly respond though!

    I have a pink-tailed trigger in a reef. He has never bothered anything, although, as with any fish, they are hit or miss. If you must have a trigger, I would recommend trying out a pink tail, that's probably one of the reef-safe-ish kinds you can find.
     
    Bifferwine, Dec 25, 2007
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  14. ReelNorth

    yote Ceritfied Mantis Hunter Moderator

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    Welcome to the reef.
    Looks like everybody else has you pretty well covered.
     
    yote, Dec 26, 2007
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  15. ReelNorth

    fatman

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    Long winded! Yuck, for a living I mainly do public speechs for environmental issues. Lots of reason for speech there. Carries over alot, as an engineer type I spend most my time alone with reams of paper facts and data. Anyboby want to know about the government ang big business plans to capture carbon dioxide gas, liquidfy it and pump it into the ocean. Only expected to cause acidfication and drop in alkalinity, lessening of dissolved calcium, dissolving of aragonite. Yeah, yeah, long winded.
     
    fatman, Dec 26, 2007
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  16. ReelNorth

    reeffreak

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    I do! I do!:bounce:
     
    reeffreak, Dec 26, 2007
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  17. ReelNorth

    fatman

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    Goggle Ocean Carbon Dioxide Sequestration. Luckily there small scale tests in the waters off Hawaii were not favorable. Actuality did not match up with university modeling research. However just this year the government decided that Carbon Dioxide is not a waste product which readily opens the door for Ocean "dumping" of Carbon Dioxide. So far Carbon dioxide is only being pumped below the ocean floor commercially for increased oil and gas production, in Norway. Here in the US it is being done inland, not yet in coastal waters or beneath them. Not yet! Mankind and their green house gases are definately de-terra forming the earth, but Ocean Sequestration seems like a very poor alternative to conservation and development of non carbon based energies and renewable energies.
     
    fatman, Dec 26, 2007
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  18. ReelNorth

    DavidA717 Soon to be Reef Expert

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    welcome to living reefs, i dont have anything else to add since everyone else has been helpful
     
    DavidA717, Dec 26, 2007
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  19. ReelNorth

    ReelNorth

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    Wow thanks everyone!!!

    As I look closer and closer, the reef thing seems to be a little tougher, but really seems to be more of the point for getting into saltwater. You can still have fish in there with a reef tank. I have heard/read that having fish & anemone are a bad mix as the fish will become snacks.

    What would you all recommend as the "ideal" way to go as far as a 125g (72x18x22) reef tank, assuming no real major budget issues. Or would you go to 180 g (72x24x24)

    Lights, rocks, critters etc

    Thanks again:helm2:
     
    ReelNorth, Dec 27, 2007
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  20. ReelNorth

    Bifferwine I am a girl

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    Hardly anyone keeps a reef tank without fish. Reef tanks consist of corals and fish. Anemones are usually not a good choice for reef tanks. Not only are they extremely difficult to keep alive (they require stronger lighting than most corals, even), but some species will catch and eat fish. If you are planning on having an anemone, you should wait at least 10 months before adding it to your tank. I would just as soon pass on one, however, I don't think they are worth it.

    The bigger the tank the better, in my opinion. If you can afford the 180, go for it. Keep in mind, the bigger the tank, the more you will have to spend on lighting, a protein skimmer, live rock, etc.
     
    Bifferwine, Dec 27, 2007
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