Can you help a newbie identify some things?

Discussion in 'New to Reefing' started by Osajus, Nov 5, 2013.

  1. Osajus

    Osajus

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    Hello,

    I just became the owner of a 35-40 gallon established tank. I also ended up with a 13 gallon that's empty. I don't have lot of experience in the hobby. I had a 55 gallon some time back and managed to kill everything. I'm hoping I don't make the same mistakes on this one.

    I am hoping to get some assistance in identifying what is in it. The previous owner didn't have a clue and just paid someone to take care of it. I have a good idea, but am hoping to get some confirmations and clarifications. Any assistance would be appreciated, please pardon my ignorance on this matter.

    Here is the tank as a whole:
    [​IMG]

    I am assuming this is some sort of colony polyp? Also, what kind of plant is that growing?
    [​IMG]

    Is this some sort of anemone? Anemonia Majano?
    [​IMG]

    Bad photo, but can someone tell me what type of urchin?
    [​IMG]

    This looks similar to what I had take over my old tank, but not quite the same. Is this red stuff normal or something I need to address? It appears to be growing quite fast.
    [​IMG]

    Thanks in advance!
     
    Osajus, Nov 5, 2013
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  2. Osajus

    Jml32788

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    I don't know about the second picture. But the third picture does look like Majano anemone and they are usually considered pests. You can kill them with Aiptasia X if you want. The fourth picture looks like a pin cushion urchin perhaps. The fifth picture is red slime algae or cyano if it is slimey but it could be red coralline algae. Those are my best guesses.
     
    Jml32788, Nov 6, 2013
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  3. Osajus

    emmett0122

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    the second pic looks like button polyps and +1 with jml on the other 3
     
    emmett0122, Nov 6, 2013
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  4. Osajus

    Aquarian

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    #2 green button polyps
    #3 majanos and a crap load of them at that.
    #4 pincushion urchin
    #5 red slime or cyano you need to address it.
     
    Aquarian, Nov 6, 2013
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  5. Osajus

    Osajus

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    Thanks a ton! I'll start working on re-positioning my power-heads and try and siphon up some of the red cud. If I use the Aiptasia to kill them, will it cause any sort of negative effect in the tank?
     
    Osajus, Nov 6, 2013
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  6. Osajus

    Jml32788

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    Aiptasia X is safe to use in your tank. I noticed that when using it on Majano's that it did not kill them with one application. So you will need to be persistent. Also, the Majano's will sting any corals or fish that it touches.
     
    Jml32788, Nov 6, 2013
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  7. Osajus

    RockStacker

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    Unfortunately, you inherited a tank that is way behind the curve.

    Majano infestation
    There are just so many in your tank that it would take you many months to get rid of all of them.
    And there is no guarantee that there are no tiny fragments left that can regenerate.

    Caulerpa macroalga - It looks like you won the pest lottery with the caulerpa serrulata.
    https://www.livingreefs.com/threads/california-and-caulerpa-ban.42056/
    This macroalgae is a pain to deal with. Even a small piece can grow into a large clump in a matter of days.
    They have tough stems and holdfasts and it usually means tearing up your sand bed and rockwork to remove them.
    Many aquarists introduce these into their sumps/refugiums in an attempt to reduce nitrates and phosphates, only to have fragments travel into their display tank and take over their tanks.

    I am not saying your tank is a lost cause, but it will take a lot of hard and smart work to get it back into shape.

    I would hate to have someone introduced into the hobby under such conditions, but you work with the hand you are dealt.
    We will try to help you out as much as we can, but some of the answers might not be that appealing. :)
     
    RockStacker, Nov 7, 2013
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  8. Osajus

    Marinne13 Northern Reefer

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    def start first with the anemones...there is a lot in that tank but a winnable battle
     
    Marinne13, Nov 7, 2013
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  9. Osajus

    Osajus

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    Wow...

    Thanks for the information. I'll start on the anemones as soon as I can get a handle on the ammonia spiking issue I am currently dealing with.

    The caulerpa serrulata is mostly in the live rock and not so much in the sand bed. You all recommend I just yank it?
     
    Osajus, Nov 8, 2013
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  10. Osajus

    Aquarian

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    Yes yank it before you have a forest of it
     
    Aquarian, Nov 8, 2013
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