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Discussion in 'User-Created Articles' started by jhnrb, Oct 7, 2005.

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  1. jhnrb

    jhnrb

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    Crabs

    There are Certain Crabs That you Should Remove.

    Many species of crab are incidental arrivals on live rock and coral base rock. There are too many species to describe here, but in general, you should remove individuals with red eyes as a matter of course. Another potentially problematic species is the hairy crab (pilumnus spp.) which is covered with beige hairlike projections.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 6, 2006
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    jhnrb

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    FORAMS & TANIDACEANS

    Forams and tanidaceans will appear on the glass.

    When you introduce live rock into an aquarium, you will notice many different organisms appearing on the glass. There will be small single celled organisms called forams (Foraminifera), small antlike crustaceans called tanidaceans and probably many more besides. All will undergo population blooms as the aquarium develops and should be left alone.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 6, 2006
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    Stomatella

    Stomatella are Beneficial Algae-Grazers on the Reef.

    Small sluglike snails are common accidental imports associated with live rock. They are called stomatella (Stomatella spp.) and have a habit of shedding their tails as an antipredator response. Although they resemble nudibranch molluscs that can often be harmful in a reef aquarium, stomatella are beneficial algal grazers that aquarists should leave alone.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 6, 2006
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  4. jhnrb

    jhnrb

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    Marine Aquarium Compatibility

    Compatibility is of the utmost importance when setting up a saltwater aquarium. The aim is to create a harmonious environment, with none of the inhabitants preying on each other. Compatibility problems are not limited to fish. When invertebrates are added to the mix in a reef aquarium there is a whole new set of compatibility issues to consider. Many fish will quite happily devour small invertebrates as part of their omnivouous diet. Occasionally the reverse is true; some invertebrates, including mantis shrimp, swimming crabs and tube anemones (Cerianthus spp.), will prey on fish. Giant mushroom polyps or large hermit crabs have been known to take unsuspecting fish.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 11, 2006
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    Fish Reputaion

    Some Fish Don't Merit their good Reputation.

    Some fish manage to avoid the "agressive" label and acquire a laid back reputation that is far from justified. One example is the Powder Blue tang (Acanthurus leucosternon). Very few books hint at the potential damage this fish can and will inflict on more peraceful tankmates. Seeking out the advice of fellow hobbyists can go a long way to avoiding problems.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 11, 2006
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    Feeding Strategy

    Look at the position of a fish's mouth. Do not give fish food they do not want or cannot eat. Judge by the position of their mouths where they naturally eat. Top mouth = surface feeder; terminal mouth = midwater; underslung mouth = bottom feeder or grazer. Long-snouted fish, such as butterfly fish, are "crevice-pickers"; barbel-equipped goatfish are substrait-sifters.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 16, 2006
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    Marine Fish Diet

    A Balanced Diet is Essential for Fish Health.

    Providing a feeding regimen that is acceptable to saltwater fish, while providing them with all their nutritional requriements is fundamental to their health and survival. Nutrition has a direct impact on the appearance, color, growth rate, disease resistance, reproductivity and general well being of your fish. Their diet must provide the essential components of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, minerals, and vitamins. Do not use fish food aimed at the freshwater or coldwater market, as it may contain too much fat. Saltwater fish need a a high protein (40-60 percent) but relatively low fat (5-10 percent) diet to thrive. Excess in a dietary component can be as damaging as a deficiency. Use a variety of foods to meet these demanding nutritional requirements.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 16, 2006
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    Frozen foods

    Frozen Foods are Best for Saltwater Fish.

    Frozen foods are by far the most popular and appropriate choice for most reef fish. There is a good range available from various sources, including foods formulated for difficult feeders, foods enriched with HUFAs (highly unsaturated fatty acids) and foods that have been irradiated to ensure they are parasite free. Be aware that frozen food can show signs of bacterial contamination within five minutes of defrosting. Thaw out frozen foods before feeding to prevent fish eating ice.

    Some frozen foods may taint the aquarium water by producing an oily film on the surface. Remove this by drawing a sheet of absorbent paper across the water surface. Always rinse frozen foods before use; this may help to defrost them and also removes any oiliness.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 16, 2006
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    Brine Shrimp

    Is Brine Shrimp a Suitable Food for Saltwater Fish?

    Brine shrimp (artemia spp.) is a useful first food for most saltwater fish because they find it very palatable and accept it readily. However, many species will need far more nourishment than brine shrimp can provide, even if enriched. As frozen foods go, Mysis shrimp is a much better staple, as it contains a greater percentage of fat and therefore is useful at keeping weight on fish that might otherwise become emaciated if solely fed on brine shrimp.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 16, 2006
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    Freshwater live foods to marine systems

    Q: CAN I FEED FRESHWATER LIVE FOODS TO MY SALTWATER FISH?

    A: Although most live foods, such as mosquito larvae, daphnia and bloodworms, should live long enough in saltwater to attract the attention of saltwater fish, it is best to feed them foods of saltwater origin only.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 19, 2006
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    Lettuce As Food

    All in all it is best to stick to foods of saltwater origin. Over reliance on terrestrial plant material should be avoided due to the possibility of a build up of oxalic acid over time. (Oxalic acid is the poison that precludes us from eating rhubarb leaves.) Most terrestrial plants, such as spinach and lettuce (blanched in boiling water before use), should be viewed merely as a treat or filler rather than as a main source of nutrition in the saltwater aquarium.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 19, 2006
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    Phytoplankton AS A FOOD

    Phytoplankton is a vital food in the reef aquarium. Phytoplankton is ofter referred to as being the basis of all life in the oceans and as such is seen as fundamental to today's reef aquarium. When you feed phyto you are in effect feeding your tank. The primary users of phyto are the minor animals, who will then go on to feed your corals and fish by reproducing and providing edible plankton in the form of eggs, sperm, and larvae, or, by being eaten themselves. Phytoplankton is available either as live phytoplankton or, as a preserved product. Live is best as it is non-polluting.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 19, 2006
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    Liquid Foods

    Many of the proprietary liquid foods aimed at corals and filter feeding invertebrates (bivalve, molluscs, sponges, sea squirts, fanworms, etc.) tend to be yeast based. Be careful when using these foods, although they are undoubtedly nutritious, there is great potential for pollution if used unwisely.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 19, 2006
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    Service R/0 units

    Do not forget to service your R/0 unit. Replace prefilters as neccessary. This may be dictated by the state of your water. Replace carbon at least annually to protect the membrane from bacterial contamination. Replace the membrane at least every five years. Be aware that the life of carbon and membrane will be proportional to the volume of water treated; the greater the volume, the more frequrently they should be changed. Manufacturers usually state a capacity that filter and membranes are capable of processing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2006
    jhnrb, Jan 19, 2006
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    Test Kits

    Not all Water Test Kits are the Same.

    Always follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully when testing water parameters; not all test kits use the same technique, especially when it comes to comparing the colors of the test sample against the supplied color chart. Some tell you to look through the tube; others want you to look down the end from the top. Keep all test kit color comparison charts out of direct sunlight or other bright light to prevent them frading gradually over time and thus giving incorrect results.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 28, 2006
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    Water Tests Tell What Is Missing

    Don't just test for nasties. As well as testing for undesirable elements, such as ammonia, nitrite, nitrate and copper, test kits also tell you what is missing in respect of good components in the water, such as oxygen, iodine and calcium.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 28, 2006
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    Bulb Replacement

    How Often Should I replace My Lights?

    Change bulbs on a regular basis. If you have a light meter, replace bulbs when the output has dropped by 30 percent. As a rough guide, replace all fluorescent bulbs on a yearly basis, but twice a year for actinic bulbs.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 28, 2006
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    Supplementation

    Using and Monitoring Supplementation.

    For the smaller tank or the tank with a lower demand, the best choice for supplementation is going to be one of the balanced two part additives commercially available. Once you start using a supplement, you will need to monitor the calcium and carbonate levels to make sure everything is working smoothly. When you have established, a stable, effective dosing regime, you can cut back on the frequency of testing.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 30, 2006
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    Supplementation Large Tanks

    Supplementation is not Enough in a Large Tank.

    With larger tanks, or ones with a high demand for calcium and carbonate, supplements are either unlikely to cope with demand or will become prohibitively expensive to adminsister. The solution here is to use a calcium reactor or kalkwasser stirrer. These tend to be expensive to purchase but are comparatively cheap to run.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 30, 2006
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    Carbonate/calcium Levels

    Carbonate and Calcium levels are inextricably linked.

    One useful trick of the trade is to monitor just your carbonate levels in the knowledge that if these start to change it is time to check the calcium levels. This works because these two substances are inextricaly linked together, so if one changes, they both change.
     
    jhnrb, Jan 30, 2006
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